main spar

main spar

main spar
The principal longitudinal, span-wise load-carrying member of an airplane or a control surface.
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Preliminary examination revealed the left wing main spar exhibited cracks from metal fatigue extending through more than 80 percent of the lower spar cap, and portions of the forward and aft spar web doublers.
An autoclave oven is used in the manufacturing process of composite parts in this case very large parts, such as the carbon fiber main spar of the SR-2X series aircraft and the Vision SF50 jet.
(I am only 5 feet 9 inches.) In a not-too-perfect forced landing, your head could easily be crushed by the impact with the main spar.
The three analyses validated the wing-sail concept, at the same time pointing out several design issues in terms of mass, reserve factor for the main spar compression, and overall deflection.
In the modified design, the team decided to combine the wing, fuselage, and main gear into one injection-molded polystyrene foam piece, with the main spar and fan housing molded in place (Figure 3).
This reviewer well remembers once trying to see just how fast his venerable Cessna 140 would fly, and the shivering and groaning of the main spar that ensued long before the red line on the airspeed indicator was reached.
A mid-upper turret, discovered in Argentina, was fitted in 1975 and during the winter of 1995-96 she received a new main spar, extending her life for the foreseeable future.
The sample was stored in a black container resembling a thermos flask and placed behind the main spar in the corridor - less than one foot from my back - for more than 40 hours.
The wicked main spar of the Lancaster is one example; the small inward opening doors of the same aircraft another.
The left wing's main spar had fractured where the upper and lower spar caps undergo a net section decrease from inboard to outboard.
"It was grounded in 1963 because of main spar fracture problems and that was when I moved onto the Vulcan which I flew from 1963 to 1974.
The main innovation, introduced by Mitchell, was the multi layered tubular top and bottom members of the main spar joined by a sheet metal shear web.