mako

(redirected from mako sharks)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to mako sharks: great white shark
MAKO 桜井 真子
Mako Sakurai
Birthday
BirthplaceTokyo, Japan
Occupation
Voice actress, Singer

Makó

(mŏ`kō), town (1991 est. pop. 27,160), S Hungary, on the Mureşul River near the Romanian border. It is an administrative and trade center and a road hub in a fertile agricultural region. The center of the Hungarian onion industry, Makó also has textile mills. There is a large Slovak population. The American journalist Joseph Pulitzer was born in Makó.

mako

(mä`kō), heavy-bodied, fast-swimming sharkshark,
member of a group of almost exclusively marine and predaceous fishes. There are about 250 species of sharks, ranging from the 2-ft (60-cm) pygmy shark to 50-ft (15-m) giants. They are found in all seas, but are most abundant in warm waters.
..... Click the link for more information.
, genus Isurus, highly prized as a game fish. Also known as the sharp-nosed mackerel shark, it is a member of the mackerel shark family, which also includes the white sharkwhite shark,
large, ferocious shark, Carcharodon carcharias. Also known as the great white shark and maneater, this shark can attack swimmers and boats without provocation, though it does not typically do so.
..... Click the link for more information.
 and the porbeagle. The mako is deep blue above and white below, with a conical head and sharply pointed snout. It may reach a length of 12 ft (3.7 m) and weigh 1,000 lb (450 kg). Extremely active, makos have been known to attack boats and are probably dangerous to swimmers, although they have no particular reputation as maneaters; they put up a ferocious fight when hooked, leaping out of the water. The mako feeds on large fishes, including swordfishes, and usually swallows its prey whole. There are two species, Isurus oxyrinchus, of the Atlantic, also known as the shortfin mako, and I. paucus, of the Pacific and Indian oceans, also known as the longfin mako. The porbeagles, or common mackerel sharks, genus Lamna, are similar to the makos, but smaller. One species, Lamna nasus, is found in the Atlantic and in the Mediterranean; another, L. ditropus occurs along the eastern coast of the Pacific. They are regarded as pests by fishermen, because they tear fishnets to feed on the catch. Makos and other mackerel sharks are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
..... Click the link for more information.
, subphylum Vertebrata, class Chondrichthyes, order Selachii, family Isuridae.

Makó

 

a city in southeastern Hungary, in Csongrád Megye (Csongrád County). Located on the Maros (Mureş) River. Population, 30,000 (1970). The city is a railroad junction and the center of an agricultural region (specializing in the cultivation of high-grade onions). Makó has a food-processing industry, including flour milling and sausage products, and agricultural machine building.

mako

1
any shark of the genus Isurus, esp I. glaucus of Indo-Pacific and Australian seas: family Isuridae

mako

2, mako-mako
NZ another name for the bellbird, Anthornis melanura

mako

3, mako-mako
a small evergreen New Zealand tree, Aristotelia serrata: family Elaeocarpaceae
References in periodicals archive ?
The US voted against the mako shark measure, but supported the other two.
More and more, pelagic sharks like the white, thresher and shortfin mako shark seem to be showing up on fishing videos from Jacksonville to Destin, Florida.
Shortfin Mako sharks are widely distributed in both tropical and
Similarly, both blue and mako sharks have been shown to display a mixed layer distribution at night with only the occasional excursion below the thermocline during the day (Holts and Bedford, 1990; Carey and Scharold, 1990; Sepulveda et al., 2004).
After modelling the probability that a mako shark would survive a year without being captured (a 72% chance) and calculating the fishing mortality rates, researchers determined that the rate at which shortfin makos were being killed in fisheries was actually 10 times higher than previously believed.
The blue and mako sharks that Braun studies seem to follow this moving food source.
[[delta].sup.15]N and [[delta].sup.13]C Bi-plot of blue and shortfin mako sharks before 1980 (BE) and after 2000 (AF).
Mako sharks are one of the few sharks you can hunt and are the fastest-swimming sharks in the ocean.
The corresponding logarithmic association between the number of shortfin mako sharks taken and time was weakly described by the following formula: Number of mako sharks = -2915ln (Year) + 10820; [R.sup.2] = 0.357 (Figure 12).
In the Hawaii region, shortfin mako sharks (Isurus oxyrinchus) occur regularly and have been misidentified as white sharks by the public and news media.
SAMUEL L JACKSON and Saffron Burrows star in this fishy tale set on Aquatica, a hi-tech deep sea research lab where a small band of scientists are experimenting on three gigantic genetically altered mako sharks.