mako

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MAKO 桜井 真子
Mako Sakurai
Birthday
BirthplaceTokyo, Japan
Occupation
Voice actress, Singer

Makó

(mŏ`kō), town (1991 est. pop. 27,160), S Hungary, on the Mureşul River near the Romanian border. It is an administrative and trade center and a road hub in a fertile agricultural region. The center of the Hungarian onion industry, Makó also has textile mills. There is a large Slovak population. The American journalist Joseph Pulitzer was born in Makó.

mako

(mä`kō), heavy-bodied, fast-swimming sharkshark,
member of a group of almost exclusively marine and predaceous fishes. There are about 250 species of sharks, ranging from the 2-ft (60-cm) pygmy shark to 50-ft (15-m) giants. They are found in all seas, but are most abundant in warm waters.
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, genus Isurus, highly prized as a game fish. Also known as the sharp-nosed mackerel shark, it is a member of the mackerel shark family, which also includes the white sharkwhite shark,
large, ferocious shark, Carcharodon carcharias. Also known as the great white shark and maneater, this shark can attack swimmers and boats without provocation, though it does not typically do so.
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 and the porbeagle. The mako is deep blue above and white below, with a conical head and sharply pointed snout. It may reach a length of 12 ft (3.7 m) and weigh 1,000 lb (450 kg). Extremely active, makos have been known to attack boats and are probably dangerous to swimmers, although they have no particular reputation as maneaters; they put up a ferocious fight when hooked, leaping out of the water. The mako feeds on large fishes, including swordfishes, and usually swallows its prey whole. There are two species, Isurus oxyrinchus, of the Atlantic, also known as the shortfin mako, and I. paucus, of the Pacific and Indian oceans, also known as the longfin mako. The porbeagles, or common mackerel sharks, genus Lamna, are similar to the makos, but smaller. One species, Lamna nasus, is found in the Atlantic and in the Mediterranean; another, L. ditropus occurs along the eastern coast of the Pacific. They are regarded as pests by fishermen, because they tear fishnets to feed on the catch. Makos and other mackerel sharks are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Chondrichthyes, order Selachii, family Isuridae.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Makó

 

a city in southeastern Hungary, in Csongrád Megye (Csongrád County). Located on the Maros (Mureş) River. Population, 30,000 (1970). The city is a railroad junction and the center of an agricultural region (specializing in the cultivation of high-grade onions). Makó has a food-processing industry, including flour milling and sausage products, and agricultural machine building.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

mako

1
any shark of the genus Isurus, esp I. glaucus of Indo-Pacific and Australian seas: family Isuridae

mako

2, mako-mako
NZ another name for the bellbird, Anthornis melanura

mako

3, mako-mako
a small evergreen New Zealand tree, Aristotelia serrata: family Elaeocarpaceae
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The US voted against the mako shark measure, but supported the other two.
In his third book, though, rather than speeding through the narrative's twists and turns with nary a bump in the road, Makos regales readers with every detail of every firefight.
Human appetites are pushing makos and other iconic sharks the brink of extinction, scientists warned in a new assessment of the apex predator's conservation status (AFP Photo/Maddie Meyer)
The ICCAT scientists suggested releasing shortfin makos could reduce mortality since research has shown these sharks have a 70-percent post-release survival rate.
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The study, using satellite tracking by researchers from Nova Southeastern University's Guy Harvey Research Institute (GHRI), the University of Rhode Island and other colleagues, shows that the fishing mortality rate of the shortfin mako in the western North Atlantic is considerably higher than previously estimated from catches reported by fishermen.
Matt said the biggest makos take advantage of the full moon to hunt sea lions in open water.
"As soldiers, we must kill or be killed, but once a person enjoys killing, he is lost." Makos, supra note 1, at 66.
In a very personal introduction, Makos explains the roots of this book in his quest to interview as many American WWII veterans as he could and then publish the interviews, first in a newsletter he and some friends worked on in high school and then as a full-fledged magazine he started in college.
Makos had worked as a seamstress her whole life and it was her passion.
This reproductive information coupled with the energy density (5562 kJ/ kg) for shortfin makos gave an estimated energy cost for reproductive growth.