maladjustment

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maladjustment

Psychol a failure to meet the demands of society, such as coping with problems and social relationships: usually reflected in emotional instability

maladjustment

[¦mal·ə′jəs·mənt]
(psychology)
Failure to conform or inadequate conformity due to the inability or a lack of motivation to change one's feelings or attitudes to adjust to the demands of the environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ideals of the maladjusted are high in three chief respects.
These ratings, called the pre and post therapy subjective ratings, showed a great decrease in the client's maladjusted behaviors.
Only then it would be possible for us to demarcate whether social problem resulted from maladjusted people or such people are cause of social problems.
This incident, we learn, threw Ligon into a psychic spin that left him wondering about his merits as an artist and pondering the connotations of his lifelong status as a maladjusted outsider.
Intellectual' conjures up an image of some snobby, maladjusted, holier-than-thou, socially inept person," said Corey D.
It has been enormously irritating for me to see Vietnam vets portrayed as maladjusted losers who contribute nothing valuable to society.
The first of these lists published by Edwin Starbuck (1928) prompted the move toward bibliotherapy, which was first applied to maladjusted children in 1946 (Agnes, 1946, pp.
It is becoming increasingly difficult to be tolerant of a society who has sympathy only for the misfits, only for the maladjusted, only for the criminal, only for the loser.
In the same book, she advocated the segregation of "morons, misfits, and maladjusted.
Major Depressive Disorder, Conduct Disorder, and Societal Conformity) had a significant role in classifying adolescents into three groups: maladjusted, nominally adjusted, and well-adjusted.
Kleinmuntz (1961) developed the original College Maladjustment scale (Mt) for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) to discriminate between emotionally well-adjusted and emotionally maladjusted college students.
The cause of child care was further undermined at the turn of the century by leaders in social work and social welfare such as Jane Addams, Florence Kelley, Sophonisba Breckenridge and Edith Abbott, who believed that child care created its own problems of delinquent and maladjusted children.