maladjustment


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Related to maladjustment: social maladjustment

maladjustment

Psychol a failure to meet the demands of society, such as coping with problems and social relationships: usually reflected in emotional instability

maladjustment

[¦mal·ə′jəs·mənt]
(psychology)
Failure to conform or inadequate conformity due to the inability or a lack of motivation to change one's feelings or attitudes to adjust to the demands of the environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the current study, we found that the relationship between proactive coping and maladjustment was mediated by stress.
The secondary focus of the study concerns the relationships between bullying, victimization, and psychological maladjustment.
With respect to measures of psychological maladjustment, girls reported more negative self-esteem, negative self-adequacy, and emotional instability.
We could find a linear increase in the maladjustment in this area as the level of shyness increased.
A particularly troublesome aspect of the definition is and always has been the social maladjustment exclusion clause.
Experience has shown that certain signals of maladjustment can be observed early on, and if not promptly and adequately treated, can lead to serious personal and social problems and to psychopathology.
He says that the normal process of children finding a free school is that mom realizes there is a problem, and then visits the child's school and discovers the depth and extent of the maladjustment.
Finally, the BASC-SRP contains 4 composite scales: (a) School Maladjustment (composed of Attitude Toward School, Attitude Toward Teachers, and Sensation Seeking scales), (b) Clinical Maladjustment (composed of Anxiety, Atypicality, Locus of Control, Social Stress, and Somatization scales), (c) Personal Adjustment (composed of Interpersonal Relations, Relations with Parents, Self-Esteem, and Self-Reliance scales), and (d) Emotional Symptoms Index (a composite of all behavioral problem items).
These children may also be at higher risk for school maladjustment, distress, and social dysfunction.
These findings have promoted a more accurate portrayal of aggressio n in community samples and directed developmental researchers' attention to alternate forms of aggression that may be associated with maladjustment.
It can be useful in predicting those who may be at risk for maladjustment and afford earlier and appropriate intervention.
In a review of available cross-cultural and intra-cultural studies, for example, Rohner and Britner (2002) provided evidence of worldwide correlations between parental acceptance-rejection and other mental health issues including: (1) depression and depressed affect; (2) behavior problems--conduct disorders, externalizing behaviors, and delinquency; (3) substance abuse; and (4) psychological maladjustment.