malfeasance

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malfeasance

Law the doing of a wrongful or illegal act, esp by a public official
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The article also discusses the role of human rights in broader duties of professional secrecy--whether those duties permit (or even require) lawyers to reveal confidential information, either to prevent crimes or serious injury or to protect a corporate client from its own malfeasant employees.
Media-induced electoral liability can moderate detrimental option problems by diminishing the likelihood that the parties of malfeasant mayors are reelected.
A weak afghan government is incapable of keeping such malfeasant influences out.
Ayatollahs have also passed their time providing support for malfeasant groups in the region.
This provides an incentive for a level of oversight; in contrast, state boards are not liable if they fail to sanction a malfeasant physician.
It is also unlikely to isolate the type of malfeasant shirking behavior that concerns variants of the models where the employee effort decision entails disciplinary risk.
He wrote in his Discourses that "one must speak of such a man with reverence" and that Savonarola's doctrine shows "prudence and the virtue of his heart." Machiavelli also wrote that the severest blow to Savonarola's reputation was the malfeasant execution of five prominent Piagnoni for high treason--"the law was not observed." Machiavelli adopted Savonarola's advice, got rid of the deceitful mercenaries who often played various sides and extorted all, and relied on the loyal citizens' militia.
The provincial setting of La Rabouilleuse quickly establishes the same economic and social exigencies that inspire the malfeasant actions of characters like Felix Grandet and Sylvie Rogron.
Moreover, it is no wonder that such politics breeds a politicized bureaucracy and a malfeasant system of law and order.
It is no wonder that such politics breeds a politicised bureaucracy and a malfeasant system of law and order.
Interestingly, both formulations of the Rule adopt the term "consequences," which connotes something vaguely malfeasant and sinister.
It is only the cacophonous protestations with which the epoch responds to the challenge--subsuming within their decibels all hope of discerning in the movement of life a tonality, a rhythm, or a tempo--that give the malfeasant away.