malice aforethought


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to malice aforethought: Excusable homicide

malice aforethought

Criminal law
1. the predetermination to do an unlawful act, esp to kill or seriously injure
2. the intent with which an unlawful killing is effected, which must be proved for the crime to constitute murder
References in periodicals archive ?
As telegraphed by his bolder-than-the-evidence subtitle, Kruse believes that modern American Christian religiosity was not grown organically from native soil but planted in our minds with malice aforethought by corporations in the 1950s.
He said his minisliy is collecting hard evidence to determine whether the deadly crush was plotted with malice aforethought.
But then, Paris is a city where every motorist is a psychopath who drives with malice aforethought rather than care and attention.
As far as Leslee Udwin is concerned, the documentary would have dissuaded any Indian men with malice aforethought from indulging in such gruesome act if they had been allowed to see it.
A person who respects justice would even look for malice aforethought here and be driven to ask the police just what it is that they are doing if the situation can get to this level.
Not with malice aforethought, McNair's reckless studs crunched into the left ankle of Wilshere during a game at the Emirates with such force that bone and ligament damage was almost inevitable.
A conspiracy by father and son, planned with malice aforethought.
The jury took less than 90 minutes to find Hoggan guilty by majority of endangering the men's lives by wilful fireraising with malice aforethought.
The ACA's legislative history, however, demonstrates that Congress clearly -- and, one might say, with malice aforethought -- wanted subsidies available only through state exchanges.
Their malice aforethought risks enkindling Syria's pyre, fuel for the smouldering inferno whether or not they press the trigger.
Andrew Joseph Duncan, a blockmaker, was charged with feloniously and with malice aforethought, killing his wife, Emma Duncan, on October 25, 1872.
His attorney decided not to pursue an insanity defense believing there was an insufficient factual basis for it, but focused on obtaining a conviction for a lesser-included offense of second degree murder or first degree manslaughter, arguing that Hooks acted in the heat of passion and not with malice aforethought.