malignant

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Related to Malignant cell: cancer cell

malignant

1. Pathol (of a tumour) uncontrollable or resistant to therapy; rapidly spreading
2. History (in the English Civil War) a Parliamentarian term for a royalist

malignant

[mə′līg·nənt]
(cell and molecular biology)
Pertaining to cells that have undergone phenotypic transformation by oncogenes or protooncogenes.
(medicine)
Endangering the life or health of an individual.
Of or pertaining to the growth and proliferation of certain neoplasms which terminate in death if not checked by treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most deaths due to cancer result from the growth of metastases originating from a selected subpopulation of malignant cells residing in a primary tumor.
The conventional model of cancer is dominated by the idea that malignant cells are aberrations, or good cells that suffer various genetic mutations and turn against their host.
Similar MMP and gene-expression changes were induced in normal stem cells cultured alone and treated with interleukin-6, suggesting that inflammatory cytokines produced by malignant cells might cause the transformation to cancer stem cells.
"An early signal, in the form of compression, appears to get these malignant cells back on the right track," he stated.
The attached antibody is critical, because it binds to the antigen, a protein located on the surface on the malignant cell.
Proponents argue that immune therapy can target a malignant cell more precisely than chemotherapy's drop-the-bomb approach.
Then, to kill malignant cells that have made their way into the bloodstream, cancer specialists give a regimen of chemotherapy.
Once inside the tumor, the bacteria release nanobodies that mask the CD47 proteins produced by malignant cells and allow the immune system to detect the tumor.
Treatments that involve the adjustment of the immune system's response to cancer and/or the use of CAR T cells - modified human immune cells - stimulate killer T immune cells to recognise and destroy malignant cells, sometimes with such long term beneficial effects that the word 'CURE' is appropriate.
These are usually transudates and will not have any demonstrable malignant cells in pleural fluid or pleural tissue.
GTS is chemotherapeutic retro-conversion characterized by an increase in metastatic mass after complete eradication of a primary malignant ovarian germ cell tumour and by normalization of serum tumour markers, either during or after chemotherapy.1,2 Incidence of GTS is 12% after ovarian germ cell tumours.3,4 There are one hundred one cases of ovarian GTS from literature published between 1977 and 2015.5 Reason for occurrence of GTS is not exactly known but hypothetically there are two major inferences of GTS formation that is chemotherapy transforms malignant cells into "benign" teratomatous elements and chemotherapy can only destroy malignant cells leaving chemoresistant teratoma behind.4,6
RCC is a type of cancer in which malignant cells form in the lining of tubules of the kidney.

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