malignant hypertension


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Related to malignant hypertension: essential hypertension, benign hypertension

malignant hypertension

[mə′līg·nənt ‚hī·pər′ten·chən]
(medicine)
A severe form of hypertension with a rapid course leading to progressive cardiac and renal vascular disease. Also known as accelerated hypertension.
References in periodicals archive ?
Malignant hypertension typically presents with nonspecific symptoms such as agitation, an altered conscious state, chest discomfort, and headache.
He has been compliant with blood pressure medications, especially after severe headaches with malignant hypertension. When it comes to taking prescription phosphorus binders, he is less compliant and has trouble remembering to do this at every meal.
The cause of malignant hypertension in this age group (21-30yr.) is chronic renal failure in 3/5 (60%) and 2/5 (40%) cases are eclampsia (Toxemia of pregnancy).
Sixty-one patients (56.0%) were secondary to malignant hypertension as the following: 32 (29.4%) with primary malignant hypertension and 29 (26.6%) with secondary malignant hypertension including 19 with IgA nephropathy, 5 with primary mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis, 4 with hyperaldosteronism, and 1 with renal artery stenosis.
Our experience as outlined in this report is similar to that of others who have reported treatment of sublingual hematoma secondary to trauma or surgical manipulation within the floor of the mouth, (8) anticoagulation therapy, (9) or malignant hypertension leading to rupture of the lingual artery.
These changes need to be monitored closely, as they can result in reduced VA and even papilloedema; swelling of the optic nerve head can be seen in cases of malignant hypertension. However, most patients with hypertensive retinopathy present without visual symptoms, although they may report decreased vision or headaches.
Syndromes most commonly associated with thrombotic microangiopathy are thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS).1 TMA may occur in other disorders, such as malignant hypertension, scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, preeclampsia, radiation nephropathy, renal allograft rejection, HIV infection, disseminated malignancies and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).
Other conditions associated with increased seizure risk include head trauma, brain tumors, alcohol intoxication and/or withdrawal, malignant hypertension, diabetes, kidney disease, fever, and use of anesthetics for surgical acts.
Such comorbidities include heart failure, angina pectoris, chronic renal failure, or severe malignant hypertension.
"You can control malignant hypertension within minutes; a bad increase in blood sugar, bad migraines, asthma attacks, within minutes," says psychiatrist Carlos Zarate of the National Institute of Mental Health in Bethesda, Md.

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