manakin

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manakin

(măn`əkən), common name for stocky, tiny birds, most measuring less than 5 in. (12.5 cm) long, comprising 59 species in the family Pipridae. Manakins are found throughout the forested areas of Central and South America, where they feed on a diet of small fruits picked on the wing, and occasional insects. They are noted for their curiously modified wing feathers, with which the birds produce a series of whirring and snapping sounds during flight. The sexes differ markedly. The females of most of the species are inconspicuous olive green birds. Males are strikingly arrayed. Primarily greenish brown to black, they have brilliant patches of red, blue, and yellow, often with further ornamental modifications, such as the long central tail feathers of the Fandango birds, genus Chiroxiphia. In manakins, as in their relatives, the cotingas, male ornamentation is often coupled with elaborate mating displays. Among the Fandango birds, e.g., C. pareola, two or more males cooperate to perform a complex series of acrobatics in order to attract female onlookers. Gould's manakin, Manacus vitellinus, clears an area of the forest floor of litter between two saplings and performs a leaping dance, snapping his wings noisily and flitting from branch to branch. When he is joined by a female, mating occurs and the female flies off to lay her 2 pale brown, mottled eggs. The male is polygamous and mates with as many females as he attracts. The female weaves delicate hammock nests of grass, slung in ferns or saplings and typically overlying water. She is entirely responsible for incubation and care of the young. Manakins are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Passeriformes, family Pipridae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Charles Darwin was fascinated by club winged manakins and wrote in 1871 about the remarkable diversity of the sounds made by these birds and their importance for "sexual purposes".
That's good news for male manakins, which rely on their violinlike songs to attract a mate.
Age and sexual difference in spatial distribution and mobility in manakins (Pipridae): inferences from mist-netting.
However, further efforts to develop methods for determining population densities of tropical birds, especially nonterritorial species such as manakins and hummingbirds, are needed.
Support for this hypothesis was found by Prum (1990) in his study of lek display behaviors in manakins, a family of Neotropical suboscine passerine birds in which all behaviorally known species are polygynous, and the males display on leks.
White-collared manakins occupy the area from Mexico to Panama, while yellow-collared manakins live between Panama and Colombia.
Pipra aureola species group (Figure 9): These small manakins inhabit forests near lowland rivers and are very common in many regions of Amazonia (Haffer, 1970).
Discover more about Kimberly Bostwick's research on manakins at: www.
In this noisy family, club-winged manakins (Machaeropterus deliciosus) stand out as the only ones to make a musical tone as well as percussive whacks.
These included: 1) the Monacan confederacy identified as containing the Monacans or Manakins, Meiponsky, Mahoc, Nunaneuck or Nuntily, Mohetan or Moneton; 2) the Nahyssan or Tutelo confederacy comprising the Yesang or Yesah, also known as Tutelo, the Monasukapanough or Saponi, and the Occanichi or Occaneechi; and the Manahoac confederacy including the Hassinnungas, Manahoac, Outponeas, Stegarke, Shakakoni, Tauxitonia, Tegninateas, and Whonhentees.
For example, manakins (Pipridae) and cocks-of-the-rock (Rupicola: Cotingidae) choose lek perches that are more sunlit than typical understory perches (Endler and Th[acute{e}]ry 1996), and such sites may provide growth advantages for seedlings.