manganese sulfide

manganese sulfide

[′maŋ·gə‚nēs ′səl‚fīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
References in periodicals archive ?
[11] Anuar, K., Abdul, H.A., Ho, S.M., and Saravanan, N., 2010, "Influence of deposition time on the properties of chemical bath deposited manganese sulfide thin films," Av.
Through the addition of manganese sulfide to the powder, we have a material that is machinable and still has a hardness in the Rockwell (C) 26-27 range.
Researchers have long known that pit corrosion occurs around small impurities--called inclusions--that contain manganese sulfide, says Ryan.
What sulfur does in an iron is form, in effect, a lubricating layer (of manganese sulfide) that facilitates machining.
It was concluded that the proper method of blancing manganese sulfide (MnS) is at the limit of solubility.
The two elements' effects on gray iron's microstructure and properties often have been attributed to the presence (or absence) of manganese sulfide formation.
Low pouring temperatures, manganese sulfide inclusions and slag from the ladle or from turbulent metal flow also cause slag blow hole defects.
The principal role and need for Mn in gray cast iron is to form the small, harmless slate-colored manganese sulfide (MnS) inclusions and tie up the S.
In gray iron, a nonmetallic manganese sulfide is present throughout the slag and segregates into the adjacent microstructure.
Included are: the blowhole caused by carbon monoxide evolution, ladle slag, and a heavy concentration of manganese sulfide inclusions in the matrix near the defect.
For a long time, founders were told to avoid sulfur; now it is known that it should be used with manganese in order to form manganese sulfide rather than iron sulfide which with its low melting point migrates to the eutectic cell boundaries.
The machinability of these steels is also improved by alloying additions of sulphur which produce manganese sulfides (MnS), responsible of short-braking chips and tool lubrication.