mania

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mania

a mental disorder characterized by great excitement and occasionally violent behaviour

Mania

 

a state characterized by excessive elevation of mood and cheerfulness, an acceleration of associative processes, instability, distractibility, and agitophasia.

Mania may arise with schizophrenia, infectious and intoxicative diseases, injuries, or brain tumors. The condition is manifested most typically in the manic state of manic-depressive psychosis.

In antiquity the term “mania” referred to all forms of mental disturbance with motor and speech agitation. Later, it was used as a synonym for delirium or an irresistible urge (for example, pyromania, the urge to set fires, and kleptomania, the urge to steal). In the first half of the 19th century the French psychiatrist J. E. D. Esquirol advanced the popular conception of monomania—an obsession with a single idea or urge. From the mid-19th century to the beginning of the 20th, mania was considered a separate disease.

I. I. LUKOMSKII

mania

[′mān·yə]
(psychology)
Excessive enthusiasm or excitement; a violent desire or passion; manifestation of a psychotic disorder.

Mania

ancient Roman goddess of the dead. [Rom. Myth.: Zimmerman, 159]
See: Death
References in periodicals archive ?
Several theories try to clarify the underlying etiology of delirious mania.
Symptoms and signs of mania include labile mood, excessive spending, grandiosity, insomnia, and psychosis together with delirium (marked disorientation, confusion).
Treatment There is no dear consensus on treating delirious mania.
The study compared three drugs and looked at the patients' overall responses, how quickly they rebounded from depression and whether a particular drug was more likely to induce mania.
The side effects, along with the idea that mania will allow them to perform at a higher level, make taking the daily pills less appealing.
Manias says the clay can be added at the final stages of polymer processing without changing current industrial practices.
The administration partially funded joint research by Gilman and Manias that was featured in the July 2000 issue of Chemistry of Materials.
We seem to be entering another phase of Market Mania.
An example of this kind of investment was the biotechnology mania of a decade ago.
2 percent has an episode of manic-depressive illness that might consist of mania, depression, or the combination of both.
In its early stages, mania may feel much like waking on a sunny day full of energy, good will, and high spirits, with a head full of ideas.