manic-depressive illness


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Related to manic-depressive illness: bipolar disorder, rapid cycling, Bipolar depression

manic-depressive illness

[¦man·ik di¦pres·iv ′il·nəs]
(psychology)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Goodwin FK, Jamison KR (2007) Manic-depressive illness. Bipolar disorders and recurrent depression, 2nd ed.
Robert Lowell suffered from severe manic-depressive illness, and it is the pedigree described in his forbears that directly descends to him and on which Jamison focuses.
His expert psychiatrist testified that the defendant suffered from manic-depressive illness accompanied by psychotic features and paranoia.
For example, depression associated with manic-depressive illness must be treated differently than recurrent depression, which is not associated with manic or hypomanic mood swings.
* Approximately 1,000 homicides are committed each year by people with untreated schizophrenia and manic-depressive illness.
In bipolar disorder, sometimes called manic-depressive illness, patients cycle between periods of elation and severe depression, and the depressive phase carries a high risk of suicide.
This form of depression is sometimes called manic-depressive illness. Not nearly as prevalent as other forms of depressive disorders, bipolar disorder is characterized by intense episodes of elation and despair, with any combination of mood experiences in between, including periods of normal moods.
Her clinical diagnoses ranged from schizophrenia to manic-depressive illness. There were many confounding variables in her life, including a tumultuous relationship with her alcoholic husband.
Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a brain disorder that occurs in about 1 percent of the population.
Between 150,000 and 200,000 individuals with schizophrenia or manic-depressive illness are homeless.
Peter Freeman, in mitigation, said O'Sullivan suffered from a manic-depressive illness.
Speaking from inside the Alternatives recovery clinic in the Silver Lake neighborhood of Los Angeles, Johnstone said he was diagnosed in 1999 with bipolar disorder, formerly known as manic-depressive illness, characterized by mood fluctuations from extreme highs to extreme lows.