mannitol hexanitrate


Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

mannitol hexanitrate

[′man·ə‚tȯl ‚hek·sə′nī‚trāt]
(organic chemistry)
C6H8(ONO2)6 Explosive colorless crystals; soluble in alcohol, acetone, and ether, insoluble in water; melts at 112°C; used in explosives and medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, his pejorative use of the word "boy," in referring to himself in the duck blind at the end of chapter one, introduces the first sentence of chapter two, "But he was not a boy," and the flashback to the physical examination of the day before in Trieste when he had taken enough mannitol hexanitrate to pass the physical that would give him a three-day pass to Venice.
All the symptoms and symbols are there: symptoms such as his failing heart, the doctor's admonitions, Cantwell's temper and physical exertions that are bad for his heart, his age, his ten concussions, and his overdose of mannitol hexanitrate; symbols such as the canals and bridges of Venice; the channels of the marshes which, like Dante's circles of hell, are closing in with Charon, the ill-tempered boatman ferrying the souls of the diseased across the river Styx to Hades; the ice on the marsh, the cold wind blowing from the north and "somewhere else" (52), the snow on the mountains, and Cantwell's driver, Jackson, who, like Stonewall Jackson, is the source of the novel's title.
In Renata's embrace, he is supremely happy and he repeatedly takes tablets of mannitol hexanitrate to keep him going even though he knows that the overdose will kill him.