mantle rock


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mantle rock

[′mant·əl ‚räk]
(geology)
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Caption: SKYLAR VANN (left), Trey Pritchett (middle) and Brea Anderson (right) linger at Mantle Rock, a spot along the Trail of Tears where hundreds of their ancestors were stranded during an unusually harsh winter.
Sarafian created a synthetic mantle rock to test in the machine.
As indicated above, catastrophic plate tectonics posits that massive flooding would have occurred as a result of the melting of hot mantle rock on the ocean floor.
Although nobody has yet found another field like Lost City, Kelley says she's 100 percent sure others exist, because there are so many other places mantle rock has been thrust up through the sea floor, exposing it to seawater and serpentinization.
As easy as it is to highlight world-renowned places like Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Acadia, it is equally important that sites like Mantle Rock are given their due so that we may all come to better understand the places and peoples that have made this country what it is.
Though scientists tried to emphasize that the two countries were not in competition, the tone at the time was clear: Collecting mantle rock was akin to bringing home bits of the moon.
Hess called the Moho an "alteration front"--a boundary where mantle rock was altered to become serpentines.
A sandstone arch called Mantle Rock looms in a nearby hollow, where thick carpets of moss soften the shapes of exposed rock.
In the May 3 Nature, Head and volcanologist Lionel Wilson of Lancaster University in England describe a model of a kimberlite eruption that explains the resulting mix of diamonds, spherules, and mantle rock in a carrot-shaped deposit.
Burke's team found that kimberlites, which are rare volcanic rocks that include diamonds, owe their origin to occasional pulses of hot mantle rock - called mantle plumes - that have risen through the entire thickness of the Earth's mantle from deep down next to the core, or innermost part, of the planet.
That well-established model began to be questioned 8 years ago, when researchers exploring some sections of the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge found small, widely dispersed areas of exposed mantle rock on the seafloor.
The researchers now theorize that over hundreds of thousands of years, as Earth's tectonic plates pulled apart, a mammoth block of mantle rock was pulled up along the fault toward the surface and eventually rolled over on the seafloor.