marabou

(redirected from marabou storks)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

marabou:

see storkstork,
common name for members of a family of long-legged wading birds. The storks are related to the herons and ibises and are found in most of the warmer parts of the world.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

marabou

1. a large black-and-white African carrion-eating stork, Leptoptilos crumeniferus, with a very short naked neck and a straight heavy bill
2. a down feather of this bird, used to trim garments
3. 
a. a fine white raw silk
b. fabric made of this
References in periodicals archive ?
ALL STORK: The Marabou Stork, aka the 'undertaker bird', now living at Birdland, Gloucestershire.
(9) Proteus species has been isolated in 13% of fresh and dry droppings of marabou storks feeding on waste from dump sites.
Clinical pathology of nestling marabou storks in Uganda.
Abstract: A captive-born marabou stork (Leptoptilos crumeniferus) was presented for swelling of the ventral air pouch of 1 month's duration.
A 6-year-old, 7 kg, male, captive-born marabou stork (Leptoptilos crumeniferus) was presented for swelling of the ventral air pouch of 1 month's duration.
The marabou stork was discharged the next day with instructions to the owner to perform nasal flushing twice daily with 5 mL diluted benzalkonium chloride and polyhexamethylene biguanide (F10 Antiseptic Solution, Health and Hygiene [Pty] Ltd, Roodepoort, South Africa) in sterile saline solution (1:250) for 10 days.
After 2 months, the marabou stork was examined in its enclosure.
The most distinctive features of marabou stork are the dorsal and ventral subcutaneous pouches.
(5) The particular anatomic features of the marabou stork led to filling of the ventral pouch as a result of the productive infections of the upper respiratory tract.
This is the first known case report of ventral pouch hemorrhage and necrosis secondary to mucus impaction in a marabou stork. The primary exudative lesion was located in a distant anatomic region (ie, the nasal cavity), which is connected through the left orbit with the ventral pouch.
Subcutaneous air pouches in the marabou stork (Leptoptilos crumeniferus).
Right, Mandy the Marabou stork; NATURAL HABITAT An inlet feeds into Kielder Reservoir at Leaplish.