marcescent


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Related to marcescent: redolent, flibbertigibbet

marcescent

[mär′ses·ənt]
(botany)
Withering without falling off.
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References in periodicals archive ?
10a) also define the genera of caulirosula plants, because they do not exhibit trichomes in the stem coverage, just overlapping and marcescent leaves.
Some characters, related to the stem axis (such as a shorter main axis with very reduced intemodes), related to the medullary and cortical apical thickening and related to stem coverage with overlapping and marcescent leaves, are directly linked to the caulirosula habit, that is, the acquisitions were carried out in the groups represented by the genera Prestelia.
Moreover, the data observed in this study suggest that the caulirosula habit is the result of an evolutive convergence, posterior to determining of other adaptive characters, such as the occurrence of stems with short intemodes, covered with overlapping and marcescent leaves.
a-c Species showing upright stems with monopodial growth and terminal rosette highlighting the marcescent leaves (white arrowhead), d-e Detail of individual showing the stem very reduced with cover (black arrows) formed by the remaining parts of the leaves (sheaths and petioles), d Front view; e longitudinal section, f-g Treelets with the main system of monopodial growth in the stem
In the Iberian Peninsula, there are 12 species and 3 subspecies of marcescent oaks.
Field work was carried out between 2006 and 2012, following sintaxonomic studies that referred to marcescent groves in central and southern Portugal.
Description: Marcescent tree to 15 m tall; leaf ovoid-lanceolate, to oblong/lanceolate 0,8-5(5,8) x 0,6-1,4(1,8) cm, with narrow lamina, short and denticulate to serrate, mucronate.
Description: Marcescent tree to 20 m tall, with anfractuous branches.
During winter, presence of marcescent leaves (senescent leaves still attached to the branches), on beech, hornbeam, and common oak is a striking phenomenon of hardwood forests in northern Europe.
Consequently, these large herbivores must ingest marcescent leaves when browsing woody vegetation.
Forty small-diameter (< 6 mm) canopy branches of each of the 3 dominant tree species with [less than or equal to] 2 years of growth and marcescent leaves present were divided into 2 groups.
Ungulates strongly selected against branches with marcescent leaves of beech and hornbeam, but showed no preference in common oak (ANOVA: leaves: [F.sub.1,120] = 18.981, P < 0.0001; species: [F.sub.2,120] = 19.803, P < 0.0001; leaves x species interaction: [F.sub.2,120] = 7.924, P = 0.001) (Fig.