ridge

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Related to marginal ridge: Oblique ridge, triangular ridge, transverse ridge

ridge

1. a long narrow raised land formation with sloping sides esp one formed by the meeting of two faces of a mountain or of a mountain buttress or spur
2. Anatomy any elongated raised margin or border on a bone, tooth, tissue membrane, etc.
3. 
a. the top of a roof at the junction of two sloping sides
b. (as modifier): a ridge tile
4. the back or backbone of an animal, esp a whale
5. Meteorol an elongated area of high pressure, esp an extension of an anticyclone

ridge

(scarp) See lobate ridge; wrinkle ridges.

Ridge

The horizontal lines at the junction of the upper edges of two sloping roof structures.

Ridge

 

a linearly extended upland, often with soft, rounded parts. Ridges are usually the remnants of mountain ranges that have been greatly eroded and then slightly uplifted (for example, the Timan Ridge and the Donets Ridge).

ridge

[rij]
(architecture)
The line on which the sides of a sloping roof meet.
(geology)
An elongate, narrow, steep-sided elevation of the earth's surface or the ocean floor.
(meteorology)
An elongated area of relatively high atmospheric pressure, almost always associated with, and most clearly identified as, an area of maximum anticyclonic curvature of wind flow. Also known as wedge.

ridge

1. The horizontal line at the junction of the upper edges of two sloping roof surfaces.
2. The internal angle or nook of a vault.
References in periodicals archive ?
Food impaction affected patient's occlusion with the following frequencies; cusp to marginal ridge relationship (72.
Leveling of occlusal height of the marginal ridge can be done by either restoring it to previous level or by grinding it to favourable anatomy.
The technique is taught in two phases, firstly as Task One which leaves a small amount of plastic tooth material as a marginal ridge and moving on to Task Two with box creation.
Turning to Scenarios Four and Eight, in these instances there was pain associated with the carious tooth with loss of marginal ridge and a sinus.
Indeed, there is currently debate concerning the indications for pulpal therapy when a primary molar is asymptomatic with some authors suggesting that a fractured marginal ridge alone is not necessarily an indication for pulpotomy treatment.
In the treatment choices selected for a mesio-occlusal cavity tooth 85 resulting in loss of more than half the marginal ridge, although with no clinical symptoms but an associated sinus for a non-anxious child patient, pulpectomy (calcium hydroxide and zinc oxide) was selected by 8/32 respondents whilst extraction with LA by 4/32 and other treatments by 6/32 postgraduates.
PG preferences for a patient with a mesio-occlusal cavity in tooth 85 resulting in loss of more than half the marginal ridge and with a history of pulpal pain and with signs of pulpal involvement with an associated sinus the preferred option was extraction.
The third reason which leads to the failure in Class II cavity design is due to the fracture of the restoration which may be as a result of isthmus fracture or marginal ridge fracture.
Loss of marginal ridge integrity has been reported as the greatest contributing factor to loss of tooth strength; thus, whenever possible the ridge should be preserved in order to maintain tooth strength [Mondelli et al.
Clinically the distal marginal ridges of posterior teeth and the incisal edges of the incisors determine the curve of Spee.