ridge

(redirected from marginal ridge)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to marginal ridge: Oblique ridge, triangular ridge, transverse ridge

ridge

1. a long narrow raised land formation with sloping sides esp one formed by the meeting of two faces of a mountain or of a mountain buttress or spur
2. Anatomy any elongated raised margin or border on a bone, tooth, tissue membrane, etc.
3. 
a. the top of a roof at the junction of two sloping sides
b. (as modifier): a ridge tile
4. the back or backbone of an animal, esp a whale
5. Meteorol an elongated area of high pressure, esp an extension of an anticyclone
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ridge

(scarp) See lobate ridge; wrinkle ridges.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Ridge

The horizontal lines at the junction of the upper edges of two sloping roof structures.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ridge

 

a linearly extended upland, often with soft, rounded parts. Ridges are usually the remnants of mountain ranges that have been greatly eroded and then slightly uplifted (for example, the Timan Ridge and the Donets Ridge).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ridge

[rij]
(architecture)
The line on which the sides of a sloping roof meet.
(geology)
An elongate, narrow, steep-sided elevation of the earth's surface or the ocean floor.
(meteorology)
An elongated area of relatively high atmospheric pressure, almost always associated with, and most clearly identified as, an area of maximum anticyclonic curvature of wind flow. Also known as wedge.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ridge

1. The horizontal line at the junction of the upper edges of two sloping roof surfaces.
2. The internal angle or nook of a vault.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leveling of occlusal height of the marginal ridge can be done by either restoring it to previous level or by grinding it to favourable anatomy.
Extrusion is associated with discrepancy in marginal ridge relationship.
Iatrogenic hazards--grinding and carving of marginal ridge on severely worn attrited tooth may increase chances of pulp exposure, causing iatrogenic damage.
ii) Consider the slope of the marginal ridge (external, internal) while restoring discrepancy in the marginal ridge relationship.
Newell DH et al 4 suggested creating food escape groove adjacent to marginal ridge prevent food impaction in tight contact area.
Above the contact areas incisally and occlusally, the spaces, which are bounded by marginal ridges they join the cusps and incisal ridges, are called incisai or oclussal embrasures.
Extrusion of a tooth which was previously retaining contiguity with the adjacent mesial and distal teeth result in occlusal step deformity between marginal ridges of extruded and non-extruded teeth.
When the same scenarios were presented, however, for a child with anxiety in receipt of dental treatment, whilst traditional restorative treatment was selected, a greater proportion of postgraduates selected a Hall Technique PMC [Innes et al., 2007a] and particularly so when more than half the marginal ridge of the tooth had been lost.
Scenario Description of Case Scenario One (NA) A 5-year-old female patient presents Five (DA) with a mesio-occlusal cavity in tooth 85 resulting in loss of less than half the marginal ridge. There are no symptoms of previous-or current dental pain.
Comparing this result between first and second molars implies that loss of the marginal ridge in the latter is less important than the former.
Preserving the marginal ridge in first primary molars was especially important for increasing tooth strength.
Clinically, the COS is measured by placing a flat plane touching the incisal edges anteriorly and distal marginal ridges of the most posterior teeth.18 This is in contrast to prosthetic dentistry where the curve begins from cusp tip of mandibular canine and follows the buccal cusp tips of posterior teeth.19 In our study mandibular incisors were used as the anterior limit of the curve as to determine the contribution of anterior vertical eruption to its development.