marginality


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marginality

the state of being part insider and part outsider to a social group. The term was perhaps first used by PARK (1928) to refer to the ‘cultural hybrid’ who shares ‘the life and traditions of two distinct groups’. Park focused particularly on migrants, stressing the disorienting effects of marginality. However, the concept can obviously be used to refer to many types of social marginality e.g. the marginality of the parvenu, the stigmatized, etc. See also STRANGER.
References in periodicals archive ?
have been projected from the domain of agricultural and religious ritual on to the realm of national politics in ways that reveal and create new sentiments and structures of marginality" (p.
In 1988 Ted Solotaroff could legitimately compare the state of the world for the Jewish writer, in contrast to the world of a quarter century earlier, as having moved from "marginality" to the "avant-garde of acculturation." Acculturation, not assimilation.
Applying our measures of marginality and of the scope for tactical voting to the 1997 election is, of course, made problematical by the constituency boundary revisions which we referred to above.
We are thus offered a sense of the ways that traditional doctrines of marriage might have encountered individual interests and assumptions, to render matronhood as variable, perhaps, as the more colourful images of marginality presented elsewhere in this collection.
And chapter 2, a reading of Nathanael West's novels, opens with what seems to be an incidental biographical detail, West's death in a car accident, a consequence of one of West's habitual traffic violations, that turns out to provide a "structural similarity to the phenomena of social marginality and personal resistance so often depicted in [West's] novels" (31).
Like other scholars in the field, such as Bernard Vincent and Roger Chartier, he believes that marginality served as a "mirror," meaning that through the examination of the marginal, one reaches an understanding of the whole society.
The HIV prevalence is 16.6 percent among blacks but just 1.1 percent among whites; black women have an even higher prevalence at 20.6 percent, owing to their intersectional marginality. In the overwhelmingly black township of Soweto, I had the chance to interact with community members and saw how unemployment-up to 70 percent among young people - has led to alcohol and substance abuse.
If one wants to maintain the binary, Aguilar quotes Tony Fry, a social scientist who looks into geographies, politics and power, and what he proposes about how 'marginality has most commonly been configured in a binary model in which it is the other 'centrality.''
In 1998, Schmidt elaborated Leimburger's concept by introducing the concept of political and cultural marginality. Comprehensive definitions can be found in Mehretu, Piggozi and Sommers (2000), Sommers, Mehretu and Pigozzi (2001) and Boniface (2000).
'I celebrate marginality; it is good to be on the opposite side.
According to Bill Ashcroft the act of appropriation in the post-colonial text issues in the embracing of the "marginality as the fabric of social experience" (Ashcroft et al.
These include his explanation of rent, marginality, under-development, globalisation, under-consumption, nongovernmental organisations, European Union and Eurozone, social movements, and last but not the least his thoughts on capitalism.