margrave


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margrave

a German nobleman ranking above a count. Margraves were originally counts appointed to govern frontier provinces, but all had become princes of the Holy Roman Empire by the 12th century

Margrave

 

originally an official in the Carolingian empire and the Holy Roman Empire.

The office of margrave was established by Charlemagne to administer marches. The margrave enjoyed broader powers than an ordinary count—particularly permanent military authority. With the development of feudalism, margraves became semi-independent or independent rulers of entire regions; in Germany they became princes. In France, Spain, and Italy, margrave (marquess) is one of the highest titles of nobility.

References in periodicals archive ?
But combining as it does a duke of Ferrara, a marquess (that is, margrave) of Montferrat, and a daughter named Annabella, the Argument to Hecatonphila clearly has something to do with that lost play.
Avelina has only two instructions: keep her true identity a secret and make sure the margrave doesn't select her as his bride.
The Margrave never responded to Bach, (who wanted a position at Brandenburg) - indeed he may never have even heard the concertos performed.
It follows on from his autobiography Margrave of the Marshes which Sheila completed in 2005 and is named after the faithful typewriter on which he banged out his acclaimed work.
Some of the Duke's distant German relations took their places - Philip's niece Grand Duchess Princess Margarita of Baden and other family members, the Margrave and Margravine of Baden and Prince and Princess Ludwig of Baden.
Princess Margarita of Baden has been invited, as have the Margrave and Margravine of Baden, and Prince and Princess Ludwig of Baden.
Des Lynam's 'I Should Have Been at Work' and John Peel's 'Margrave of the Marshes' took joint second place, with 14% of the votes each.
Luckily for the citizens of Bayreuth, the tiny 18th-century Margrave's opera house has survived Wagner's reforms.
The bed was certainly used by William III's cousin Prince Louis (Ludwig Wilhelm), Margrave of Baden-Baden, during a state visit in January and February 1694, when it still stood in the former Queen's (Mary of Modena's) apartment at Whitehall, thus further substantiating the possible connection with her marriage.
These pieces have been sorted by size in a centrifuge, says Rice's John Margrave. Such short tubes might be useful as uniform, rigid parts in new electronics or as reinforcing filler in composite materials for structures ranging from rockets to tennis rackets.
The Reformation made a weak beginning here, depending ultimately upon the initiative of the margrave, who first introduced the office of superintendent, on the Saxon model, in 1528, and who made the territory officially Lutheran by publishing a church ordinance at the end of 1532.
Bruce Margrave, buyer at Tuesday Morning, a catalog, agreed, but said that the nuetrals are not yet dead.