marine snow


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marine snow

[mə′rēn ′snō]
(oceanography)
A concentration of living and dead organic material and inorganic debris of the sea suspended at density boundaries such as the thermocline.
References in periodicals archive ?
The term "marine snow" was first coined in the 1930s by biologist and explorer William Beebe, who saw it firsthand, peering through the portholes of his ship-tethered diving bell, the Bathysphere.
(2005) showed that while clams do inhale marine snow containing QPX particles into their mantle cavity, they do not ingest them and instead reject them as part of the pseudofeces.
Alldredge AL, Silver MW (1988) Characteristics, dynamics and significance of marine snow. Progress in Oceanography 20(1):41-82 doi: 10.1016/j.
When Passow and colleagues tried to simulate the conditions in lab, one simulation found that month-old marine snow would have sunk to the seafloor relatively fast-sinking hundreds of yards a day, compared with an average marine-snow sinking rate of 115 feet (35 meters) a day.
On the way down, the camera lens illuminates a nighttime blizzard, a flurry of broken chunks of plankton called "marine snow." This is evidence of what caused this year's hypoxia - an onslaught of nutrients brought to shallow coastal waters by wind-driven currents, whose decomposing structures suck up available oxygen.
(1995) found a strong correlation between the vertical distribution of marine snow and density discontinuities off central California.
Concepts like "herds of sea urchins" or "marine snow" for example were hard to comprehend, as was an (underwater) mountain range 28,000 miles long - the biggest on the planet.
Furthermore, bivalve veligers are known to associate with marine snow (Green and Dagg, 1997; Shanks and Walters, 1997), creating localized high larval densities.
Yoerger also wanted scientists to be able to use the vehicle to also observe all kinds of other phenomena going on in the ocean, such as the movement of carbon-rich particles known as marine snow.
Request for quotation: Elemental Analyzer for Measurement of Carbon and Nitrogen in Particles, Marine Snow and Sediments, including a Unit for direct inorganic Carbon Measurement.
"These particles were probably transported to these extreme depths in rapidly sinking marine snow, the aggregated remains of phytoplankton that lived in the sunlit surface ocean, or in faecal pellets from zooplankton," he added.
Second, some clays swell in seawater and coagulate into fluff, or what Sengco describes as "marine snow." As these flakes sink, they rake down additional algal cells.
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