Marker

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marker

[′märk·ər]
(immunology)
Any antigen that serves to distinguish cell types.
(ordnance)
A sign or signal for marking a location on land or water; frequently contains pyrotechnics.

Marker

 

a device for guiding a sower or planter to form interrows of a planned width. A marker consists of an extendable bar connected by a hinge to a sower or hitch. On the outer end of the bar is a disk, which is mounted at an angle and rotates freely; as it moves over the field, it leaves a furrow in the un-seeded area. On the next pass of the unit the furrow is used to guide the right front wheel or the inside edge of the right track of a tractor. Sowers and planters usually operate with right and left markers. The overlap (M) of the marker is determined according to the following formulas:

where a is the distance between the front wheels or the inside edges of the tracks, B is the distance between the extreme colters of the sower, and C is the size of the interrow.


Marker

 

an attachment to a single- or double-row sower that ensures parallel rows of seeds in subsequent passes. A marker consists of a beam with a weight on the end; the beam is secured to the front of the tractor. The tractor is steered so that the weight of the marker is above the track left by the planter wheel or marker disk on the preceding pass. Markers are often made reversible so that they can be used on both sides of the tractor.

marker

A sign, plaque, or monument that designates a building, site of historic importance, or boundary.

marker

markerclick for a larger image
Distance to go markers on the sides of runway.
An object displayed above ground level in order to indicate an obstacle or delineate a boundary (ICAO). Markers should be frangible, and those located near a runway or taxiway should be sufficiently low to ensure clearance for propellers and the engine pods of jet aircraft. The various types of markers are the distance-to-go markers, unpaved runway-edge markers, stop-way-edge markers, taxiway-edge markers, taxiway centerline markers, boundary markers, and unpaved taxiway-edge markers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 3 shows that the extracts of the blank mussel samples did not affect the expression of any of the selected marker genes, while mussel contaminated with AZAs resulted in a "perfect" AZA/YTX-profile.
In CTC+ samples, epithelial marker genes were always expressed in combination with stemness or EMT associated markers, supporting the strong role of EMT in CTC characterization.
To establish the MONSTER in other hyperthermophilic archaea, dual marker genes are required for counter-selection and screening (Figures 4(c) and 5(c)).
In the first case study we end up with the marker genes for (i) the proliferation activity composed of 12 genes, CDC20, TK1, KNL1, CENPE, STIL, ANLN, NDC1, NUF2, KIF20A, PLK4, CCNB1, and CCNA2, and (ii) the quiescence state composed of 12 genes: COL5A1, TGFBI, TCEA2, WNT9A, MMP11, LAMB1, KRT14, LTBP1, PHLDB1, TIMP3, LRP1, and COL18A1.
For example, marker gene amplicons (typically rRNA) provide a thorough assessment of biodiversity, especially in regard to "rare biosphere" taxa (Sogin et al., 2006) that may not be recovered from shotgun metagenomic sequencing.
The kanamycin resistant gene (nptII) is one of the most frequently used selectable marker genes for the development of transgenic plants and has been used to engineer dicots (Bevan et al., 1983; Fraley et al., 1983) as well as monocots (Cui et al., 2011).
We found all the three marker genes were up-regulated by both neoeriocitrin and naringin treatment, and neoeriocitrin obviously had a higher activity.
The first consists of producing marker-free plants whereby the selectable marker is removed by a variety of methods, including site-specific recombination, transposon-mediated elimination and cotransformation followed by segregation but such methods are either more difficult to implement or are less efficient than procedures that leave the marker genes in the plant (Day, 2003; Miki and McHugh, 2004).
The concerns of the EU's Environment Commissioner, Stavros Dimas, as to whether the Amflora potato is innocuous to human health or to the environment are thus shared by two scientists from the EFSA, states a presentation transmitted by the agency to the European Commission on " the risks of resistance associated with the use of antibiotics as marker genes in GMOs".
That's happening as part of a venture to discover the structure, or sequence, of some of switchgrass's most important genetic material: marker genes.
The compositions are DNA constructs that comprise novel arrangements of T-DNA molecules containing genes of interest, positive selectable marker genes, and conditional lethal genes.