markup language

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markup language

[′märk‚əp ‚laŋ·gwij]
(computer science)
A set of rules and procedures for markup.

markup language

A set of labels that are embedded within text to distinguish individual elements or groups of elements for display or identification purposes. The labels are typically known as "tags."

For rendering (displaying and printing), markup languages indicate where font and other layout changes start and stop. For content identification, markup languages turn a text document into the equivalent of a database record in which individual data elements can be located for processing. In a database, elements are placed in a predefined structure. In a document, data elements reside in a freeform structure like text and must be identified with tags that mark their beginning and end.

It All Started with SGML
SGML is the granddaddy markup language that served as the foundation for HTML and XML. HTML is used for rendering the document, and XML is used for identifying the content of the document. See XML vocabulary, microformat, SGML, HTML and XML.
References in periodicals archive ?
The receiver needs the markup tags to interpret the message: the format and content of database data, multimedia graphic files or audio files, debit card transactions, credit card authorizations, or any other various document types.
When a text is keyboarded, this information can be embedded in the text at the time of capture in the form of encoding or markup tags.
The promise of XML is to provide a means by which groups of individuals can define a set of markup tags that enable them to communicate information structure and content across disparate computer networks and systems.
For example, you could develop a specialized set of markup tags that not only specify what each element is, but also establish document structure.
A few standard markup tags are all that is necessary to create quite professional looking documents.
The driving force behind the power of XML is that you or your company, by using a defined set of markup tags, can encode your documents with information that precisely describes your data.