marmalade


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marmalade

[Port.,=quince preparation], thick preserve of fruit pulp, originally made from quinces (marmelos) and known in England from the 15th cent. Marmalade has a jellylike consistency and a slightly bitter flavor, caused by including the rind of some tart fruit such as the Seville orange or the grapefruit. The name is also applied to various jams made tart by the addition of lemon juice or other acid ingredients.

marmalade

(of cats) streaked orange or yellow and brown
References in classic literature ?
"I will first cut the pie for you; I am going to have muffin and marmalade," said Ribby.
"May I pass you the marmalade?" said Duchess hurriedly.
"I beg your pardon," persisted Sir Joseph; "marmalade."
She pronounced the tea to be excellent, and praised the exquisite taste in which the marmalade was arranged in the saucers.
There was also ham and marmalade and bread, so that he had a really very tolerable breakfast indeed.
The gentleman who was spreading the marmalade returned, without looking up from that occupation, 'What did he call the Dog?'
What matter was it that on the outside of the jar the eye of mere observation noted the words "Keelwell's Marmalade"?
Portions of marmalade had likewise been distributed on a service of plates constructed of curlpaper; and cowslip wine had been quaffed from the small squat measuring glass in which little Rickitts (a junior of weakly constitution) took her steel drops daily.
Mary drank some tea and ate a little toast and some marmalade.
There was a highly seasoned stew with meat and vegetables, a dish of fresh fruit, and a bowl of milk beside which was a little jug containing something which resembled marmalade. So ravenous was she that she did not even wait for her companion to reach the table, and as she ate she could have sworn that never before had she tasted more palatable food.
Next, aided by anxious sailors, he and Daughtry dropped into the lazarette through the cabin floor, and began breaking out and passing up a stream of supplies--cases of salmon and beef, of marmalade and biscuit, of butter and preserved milk, and of all sorts of the tinned, desiccated, evaporated, and condensed stuff that of modern times goes down to the sea in ships for the nourishment of men.
Bucket lays in a breakfast of two mutton chops as a foundation to work upon, together with tea, eggs, toast, and marmalade on a corresponding scale.