marquetry


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

marquetry

(mär`kətrē), branch of cabinetwork in which a decorative surface of wood or other substance is glued to an object on a single plane. Unlike inlaying, in which the secondary material is sunk into portions of a solid ground cut out to receive it, the technique of marquetry applies both field and pattern material as a veneer of equal thickness. Wood is most often used for the ground, or field, and to a considerable extent also—when of differing color, grain or kind—for the decorative sections. Tortoiseshell, metal, ivory, and bone are also used. The process was derived from the true wood inlay known as intarsiaintarsia
or tarsia,
properly a form of wood inlaying. The term is sometimes applied to inlays of other materials such as ivory and metal. It is differentiated from marquetry by the basic veneering process of the latter.
..... Click the link for more information.
 and reached a high point of development in its use by the Dutch in the 17th cent.; subsequently the French were its chief exponents, with the Boulle family (see Boulle, André CharlesBoulle or Buhl, André Charles
, 1642–1732, French cabinetmaker, the master of a distinctive style of furniture, much imitated, for which his name has become a synonym.
..... Click the link for more information.
) creating a distinctive style through the use of copper and tortoiseshell. Marquetry in England was never carried to the heights of elaboration or technical brilliance reached on the Continent, but in the latter part of the 18th cent. work of considerable distinction and refinement was produced.

Bibliography

See M. Campkin, The Technique of Marquetry (1989).

Marquetry

Inlaid pieces of a material, such as wood or ivory, fitted together and glued to a common background.

Marquetry

 

a type of mosaic consisting of irregularly shaped pieces of veneer that vary in color and texture and are affixed to a surface. Marquetry is used in furniture-making and in the manufacture of paneling and other wood products. The process was particularly popular in the 17th and 18th centuries in France and Germany.

REFERENCE

Meliksetian, A. S. Mozaika iz dereva. Moscow, 1969.

inlay, intarsia, marquetry

1. A shaped piece of one material embedded in another as part of a surface ornamentation.
2. Such ornamentation as a whole. Also see encaustic tile.

marquetry

marquetry
Inlaid pieces of a material, such as wood or ivory, fitted together and glued to

marquetry

, marqueterie
a pattern of inlaid veneers of wood, brass, ivory, etc., fitted together to form a picture or design, used chiefly as ornamentation in furniture
www.marquetry.org
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ghost Majestic Horse Collection is also Characterized by its magnificent marquetry , as it celebrated the element 'wood' being marked in the Chinese year of the Horse, with a glorious galloping stallion featured on the car's perfectly polished wooden dashboard.
Acuzar has put up a brick factory, wood works and furniture factory to include marquetry and parquetry as well as casting products made of plaster of Paris.
In addition to marquetry and paneling, it is also used for turnery, wood sculpture and carving.
And he went back to marquetry in 1994 during the Senior Golf Tour as he had too much time on his hands.
The leaf veins are outlined by the marquetry technic.
Boeing's EBACE display features a cabin finished in a bright, high-gloss sycamore wood, with hand-crafted marquetry woodwork integrated in the entrance panel.
Marquetry, the skill of applying pieces of veneer to a structure to form decorative patterns, designs or pictures, is also cut by hand and inlaid into the solid body of the piece giving an effect that is almost three-dimensional.
The crystal glasses are gleaming, the silver is polished, marquetry panels varnished and cabins prepared; arrangements are complete for the start of the Venice Simplon-Orient-Express' 2013 season.
A fine bureau, ornately decorated, ormolu-mounted satine, oeil de vermeil and kingwood parquetry, by Millet sold for [pounds sterling]49,250, an ormolu-mounted maple, mahogany, citronnier and fruitwood marquetry breakfront commode sold for [pounds sterling]43,250 and rare ebony and ebonised Japanese lacquer bureau sold for [pounds sterling]39,650.
Several years ago, Gordin added a new technique to his repertoire, with works in marquetry, the ancient technique of applying thin pieces of wood to form a design--constructing an image in its most literal sense.