martyrium


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martyrium

A place where the relics of a martyr are deposited.
References in periodicals archive ?
13 and passim (on the link between the martyrium with its relatively small dome and the larger dome of the East Christian church building); 36-37 (on the domical elements in the narratives portrayed on the Stuma and Riha patens, figs.
Thereafter, Christians moved in and converted the installation into a monastery complete with a church (the former principia) and, apparently, a martyrium.
Christen werden sich dennoch an die bekannten Pieta-Darstellungen erinnert fuhlen, Juden vielleicht an die Makkabaren denken, die ihre im Martyrium vor ihr gestorbenen Sohne beklagt.
According to the history books, Doged was slain by King Cilydd who wanted Doged's wife as his own, and the original church was probably erected as a martyrium to him in the 6th century.
Built as a martyrium around the site of the Burning Bush, the church has maintained a tradition of prayer, worship and contemplation since that time.
lines 225-6]; nullum martyrium valet, si odium in corde habitet .
Constantine's Holy Sepulchre Church was consecrated in 335 and consisted of a Martyrium (three-aisled basilica, atrium, and portico) and the Anastasis (the tomb monument, rock of Calvary, and atrium).
Discussing that show in his influential Artforum essay, Buchloh inquired, "What mental semi-trance are we supposed to enter before we are allowed to embark on wandering down the spiral of 24 Stations (whose martyrium, whose mysterium)?
And why not discuss that other "privileged instrument" of Christian unity (Pastor Aeternus, Vatican I) which is the Petrine ministry, historically given to the bishop of the city of the martyrium Petri et Pauli, but certainly adaptable to the needs of our time?
s discussion of the "psychological connection between baptism, martyrdom, and dream" in the Passion of Perpetua (73-86) where he argues that "in martyrdom, the imagined reality of ritual becomes a physical reality through death" (72), an association that continues to made in the medieval West through the uniting of baptistery with martyrium.
On the connections between Jewish and Christian martyrologies, see Aune, "The Martyrs as Heroes of the Christian People: Some Remarks on the Continuity between Jewish and Christian Martyrology, with Pagan Analogies," in Martyrium in Multidisciplinary Perspective, ed.
In contrast, Golgotha received only a passing architectural nod, situated in an undifferentiated corner of the open courtyard joining the Anastasis to the Martyrium basilica.