mass higher education

mass higher education

any national system of HIGHER EDUCATION which has moved from ‘élite’ provision catering for only a small minority of the relevant age group, to one which allows for an ever-expanding mass entry, ultimately including the majority of the population. In the UK in the 1950s, when no more than 5% of the age group entered higher education, opponents of expansion argued that, as Kingsley Amis put it, ‘more will mean worse’. However, in the UK and elsewhere élitist conceptions of higher education have generally lost ground to the proponents of mass higher education. In the US and Japan participation in higher education already exceeds 50% of the relevant age group, and is expanding rapidly elsewhere. By the early 1990s, the proportion of school leavers entering higher education in the UK had increased to around 30%. The consequences of mass higher education, according to Martin Trow (1962), are that, at around 15% participation, ‘élite’ standards and patterns of provision can no longer be sustained across the entirety of a national system. The outcome has usually been a more ‘differentiated’ system of higher education. In the US an example of an extended hierarchy of many different types and levels of higher education exists, including the highest ranked research universities, and Ivy League colleges and universities, on the one hand, to the lowest ranked, community and two-year colleges on the other. The implications of such a transformation and differentiation of higher education for EQUALITY OF OPPORTUNITY in higher education and in subsequent employment are complex (see BINARY SYSTEM, CREDENTIALISM, SCREENING, GRADUATE LABOUR MARKET) as are many other features of the transformation of higher education. See POSTCAPITALISM and POSTCAPITALIST SOCIETY, INFORMATION SOCIETY.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the same event, I recall an East Asian economist pointing out that spurts in economic growth in Germany and East Asia had preceded, not followed, mass higher education.
Their topics include higher education expansion and the growth of science: the institutionalization of higher education systems in seven countries 1945-2015, science production in the US: an unexpected synergy between mass higher education and the super research university, the rise of higher education and science in China, science production in Taiwanese universities 1980-2011, and scientific journal article production and the emergence of a national research system in Qatar 1980-2011.
The submission acknowledges the challenge of sustaining a world-leading and accessible mass higher education system in a constrained budget environment.
The move from elite to mass higher education has been accompanied by concerns around the globe that many students are not well prepared to cope with the transition to university education, be it on-campus or distance education (Lowe & Cook, 2003; Rosenman, 1996; Wu, 2013).
Mass higher education in Geiger's vernacular was not massive by twenty-first century standards but grew from 5.
He drew attention to the potential issues involved in creating systems of mass higher education while also moving towards internet-based universal access.
As countries embrace mass higher education, the cost of maintaining universities increases dramatically relative to an elite system.
Most important for me, this Award is an endorsement of the vision I have been trying to sell through advocacy work; namely the need for South Sudan to turn its back on outmoded colonial elitist type of higher education that favours few bright students, and move towards mass higher education that provides ample opportunity for most to study at post secondary level.
This study is grounded in the considerable body of scholarship examining the powerful dynamics operating within the knowledge society, the development of mass higher education systems, the co-evolution of university and society, and the authorization of social experience by the knowledge system.
Part of the excellent Oxford International Studies in Higher Education Series, Structuring Mass Higher Education: The Role of Elite Institutions consists of an introduction followed by two parts: Structural Change in Systems of Higher Education (Chapters 2-11) and Elite Institutions in the Age of Mass Higher Education (Chapters 12-18).
The information on SAT scores published by the College Entrance Examination Board goes back only to 1966-67, after the era of mass higher education had already begun.
They address the positive and negative aspects of globalization for higher education and whether globalization can be managed through policy; emerging mass higher education systems around the world; alternative cross-border activities to provide education; international research collaborations; establishing academic programs in foreign countries; the academic value of the study abroad experience; creating an international experience on a domestic campus; faculty engagement and activity; recruiting and retaining foreign students; the value of colleges in a global society; and American higher education.