masseter

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Related to Masseter muscle: temporalis muscle

masseter

[mə′sēd·ər]
(anatomy)
The masticatory muscle, arising from the zygomatic arch and inserted into the lower jaw.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical and radiographic examination revealed that facial asymmetry developed due to benign hypertrophy of the left masseter muscle. The patient had no systemic diseases or relevant medical history.
For example, volume, length and position of the temporal and masseter muscles vary among bat species from different dietary groups (Dumont, 1999; Freeman, 1981; 1984, Nogueira et al., 2005, Swartz et al., 2003; Van Cakenberghe et al., 2002; Dumont et al., 2009).
Examination of masticatory muscles was performed: masseter muscles, neck muscle, and muscle of the upper limb.
75 units of botulinum toxin type A was injected equally into five points at the centre of the lower third of the masseter muscle (Figure 1(b)).
Relationship between electrical activity of the temporal and masseter muscles, bite force, and morphological facial index.
The patient had a history of BoNT-A injections several times into the masseter muscles without any complication.
Although IMHs are generally located in the truncus and extremities, the most common site of origin is the masseter muscle in the head and neck region (2).
The origin of the masseter muscle is on the lateral part of the zygomatic arch and is inserted into the angle of the mandible.
Frequent chewing of gum can lead to masseter muscle problems that are result of your constant grinding of teeth at night.
Physical examination findings included mild edema, allodynia, and hyperalgesia in the bilateral preauricular area and bilateral masseter muscle. Panoramic radiograph showed limited interincisal mouth opening (12 mm) (Figure 1a).
Jitter analysis with concentric needle electrode in the masseter muscle for the diagnosis of generalised myasthenia gravis.
In the period of 5 min, an increase occurred in the electromyographic activity of the right and left masseter muscle; and in the period of 15 min, there was hyperactivity of the electromyographic pattern of temporal muscles, compared to the condition of the mandibular at rest, with no statistically significant difference.