massive

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massive

1. Pathol affecting a large area of the body
2. Geology
a. (of igneous rocks) having no stratification, cleavage, etc.; homogeneous
b. (of sedimentary rocks) arranged in thick poorly defined strata
3. Mineralogy without obvious crystalline structure
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

massive

[′mas·iv]
(geology)
Of a mineral deposit, having a large concentration of ore in one place.
(mineralogy)
Of a mineral, lacking an internal structure.
(paleontology)
Of corallum, composed of closely packed corallites.
(petrology)
Of a competent rock, being homogeneous, isotropic, and elastically perfect.
Of a metamorphic rock, having constituents which do not show parallel orientation and are not arranged in layers.
Of igneous rocks, being homogeneous over wide areas and lacking layering, foliation, cleavage, or similar features.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Hemmed in here by the massive thickness of walls and arches, the storm within the fortress and without was only audible to them in a dull, subdued way, as if the noise out of which they had come had almost destroyed their sense of hearing.
The massive lady told the three children sharply to look at their picture-book.
With a little cry she struck him full in the mouth with the massive bracelets that circled her free arm.
Concentrating my mind upon the massive lock I hurled the nine thought waves against it.
They then came to a massive door, which after the introduction into the lock of a key which the young man carried with him, turned heavily upon its hinges, and disclosed the chamber destined for Milady.
These temples are built upon massive substructions that might support a world, almost; the materials used are blocks of stone as large as an omnibus--very few, if any of them, are smaller than a carpenter's tool chest--and these substructions are traversed by tunnels of masonry through which a train of cars might pass.