mastectomy

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Related to mastectomies: total mastectomy

mastectomy

(măstĕk`təmē), surgical removal of breast tissue, usually done as treatment for breast cancercancer,
in medicine, common term for neoplasms, or tumors, that are malignant. Like benign tumors, malignant tumors do not respond to body mechanisms that limit cell growth.
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. There are many types of mastectomy. In general, the farther the cancer has spread, the more tissue is taken. The radical mastectomies of the past (which removed not only the breast, but underlying chest muscle and lymph nodes) have largely been replaced by less drastic, but equally effective procedures. For small tumors, lumpectomy, removing just the tumor and a margin of tissue, may be performed. A partial, or segmental, mastectomy removes the cancer, some breast tissue, the lining over the chest, and usually some lymph nodes from under the arm; total or simple mastectomy removes the whole breast; modified radical mastectomy takes the breast, lining over the chest muscles, and lymph nodes.

Breast reconstruction can be done using the patient's own tissue or breast implantsbreast implant,
saline- or silicone-filled prosthesis used after mastectomy as a part of the breast reconstruction process or used cosmetically to augment small breasts.
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. Mammograms and self-conducted breast exams have done much to reduce the need for radical procedures because they have increased early detection of the cancer, allowing it to be treated before it has spread.

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mastectomy

[ma′stek·tə·mē]
(medicine)
Surgical removal of the breast. Also known as mammectomy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mastectomy

the surgical removal of a breast
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Major and minor complications following mastectomy with IBR occurred in 11 of 57 mastectomies (19.3%).
Considering the higher incidence of prophylactic mastectomies and the present controversy on sentinel lymph node biopsy in this type of surgery, our study adds to the literature by specifically addressing this subject in a high risk for occult carcinoma women, BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, and to whom preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was routine.
In the study, nine times as many women had lumpectomies as had double mastectomies.
Dr Jeremy Thomas, a consultant pathologist at the Western General Hospital in Edinburgh, said: "These two groups of women - those having a mastectomy after failed breast conservation and those having a mastectomy for tumours smaller than 20mm - accounted for 49% of all mastectomies."
(4,5) Specifically, Wheeler and Masters previously described a lateral S shaped incision which they applied to subcutaneous mastectomies for benign diagnoses.
Now the trust has begun a review of women who had mastectomies under his care since he joined the hospital in 1998 to 2007.
Consultant surgeon Ian Paterson used a "cleavage sparing" procedure when he performed mastectomies on the NHS at Solihull Hospital.
* "Under WHCRA, if your group health plan covers mastectomies, the plan must provide certain reconstructive surgery and other post-mastectomy benefits."(1)
But West Midlands Cancer Intelligence Unit, which was drafted in to review cancer recurrence rates of all Mr Paterson's patients over the past decade, said the fact that one patient had redeveloped the disease was in line with the Association of Breast Surgeons' recognised rates for mastectomies of between three and five per cent.
Mamounas of Aultman Hospital in Canton, Ohio, and his colleagues reported the 10-year incidence of local or regional failure based on type of surgery was 12.3% in patients who had mastectomies and 10.3% in those who had lumpectomies plus chemotherapy.
After a median follow-up of 6 years, contralateral breast cancer developed in 12 (0.4%) women who did not undergo contralateral prophylactic mastectomies.
One study reported that among women enrolled in managed care and FFS plans in five states, the proportion of mastectomies performed on an outpatient basis grew from less than 2% in 1993 to as high as 22% in 1996 (Case, Johantgen, and Steiner 2001).