master arm

master arm

[′mas·tər ′ärm]
(engineering)
A component of a remote manipulator whose motions are automatically duplicated by a slave arm, sometimes with changes of scale in displacement or force.
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References in periodicals archive ?
My WSO did his checks and reported he was "checks complete in the back, waiting for master arm, and TDC," which is standard for a two-seat crew.
First one is a bulky system like ARMin [2], MEDARM [3], and Sarcos Master Arm [4] where the motion is stable, but it cannot be effective as an assistive device for the paralyzed people.
The remote control system consists of a master arm and a master foot that corresponds with the robot's arm and foot.
The manipulator features an optional air-conditioned cab, a one-handed master arm controller, a working arm and an optional attached pneumatic power source.
They include a slave limb that follows the motions of a person's arm that's yoked into a master arm across the room.
I instinctively reduced my dive angle to 20 degrees and reached for the MASTER ARM switch.
By moving a master arm located in the cabin, he controls online the direction of movement of the arm as well as the cutting force.
In one important type of human-robot interaction, called teleoperation, a human operator handles a small "master arm," which controls the movements of a bigger "slave" arm located some distance away.
Master arm went to safe, and SIM (simulation) was boxed as we sorted through the confusion.
The station was selected, stores were selected with the select-jett knob, and master arm was on; but SIM, that nemesis of strikefighter pilots ever)where, still was boxed.
The system's master arms give the operator full range of motion of the robot's corresponding joints and the master foot allows the operator to walk in place in the chair to move the robot forward or laterally.
From strictly small-time customers, Yuri, in almost absurdly quick order, brings now-partner Vitali along to the West Berlin arms fair of 1983, where master arms dealer Simeon Weisz (Ian Holm) gives him a one-sentence brush-off: "I'm in the business to change governments."