master mason


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master mason

An exceptionally well-qualified mason in the Middle Ages; a position more or less equivalent to that of an architect today.
References in periodicals archive ?
(53) Pedicord, "George Lillo," 404, acknowledges as much in his cursory reading of Lillo's play: "Thorowgood is the Master Mason, and Trueman is his exemplary Entered Apprentice Mason ...
A Loyalist and the owner of extensive estates in the Mohawk Valley, Sir William Johnson UE served as the Superintendent of Indian Affairs and a member of the Governor's Council, "being 'influential in all policy matters of New York' ..." (5) On 19 April 1766, Sir William Johnson became a Master Mason (6) and on 23 May 1766 received a charter from the Provincial Grand Lodge of New York for St.
Master Mason: Look at these bastions, These fortifications: they must have been built for eternity.
There are three major degrees in Masonry; Entered Apprentice, Fellow-Craft and Master Mason. These are referred to as the Blue Lodge, or Craft Masonry.
The new gargoyles will depict various animals playing musical instruments, in keeping with Psalm 148, where "beasts and all cattle, creeping things and feathered fowls" are among those exhorted to "praise the name of the Lord." The cathedral's master mason, French-born Pascal Mychalysin, is currently working on designs including a ram, a lion, and single- and double-headed wolves.
The highest standard degree is that of Master Mason. Masonic myth traces the origins of the fra-ternity to the Phoenician masons who worked on Solomon's Temple, as the Hebrews lacked the knowledge necessary to realize the king's architectural vision.
At one point Hiscock states, "Well before the end of the eleventh century, the function of master mason was already becoming differentiated from that of working mason to the point where the master mason had begun to operate, and be recognized, as a lay architect" (171).
[53] They watched over the artistic and architectural changes at the cathedral, and probably selected the master mason s, for example, and the woodworkers.
The prolific and authoritative Albert Mackey (a 33[degrees] Master Mason), a great Masonic scholar of the middle nineteenth-century, explained that "the Shock of Entrance [in the meeting with death] is the symbol of the disruption of the candidate from the ties of the world, and his introduction into the world of Masonry.
The designers contacted a master mason with more than 40 years of experience who suggested an innovative use of paint: impregnating plaster with Sherwin-Williams ProMar 200 Latex Interior Paint in the color of Sherwin-Williams No.
Yesterday, the master mason joked: "The only arches I don't know anything about are the ones on my feet!"
Their rituals may have varied, but Ancients and Moderns passed members through the same three degrees of apprentice, fellow craft, and master mason. They used the same organization of lodges linked together under a grand lodge with masters, wardens, and other officers to preside over their affairs.