master switch


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms.

master switch

[′mas·tər ‚swich]
(electricity)
Switch that dominates the operation contactors, relays, or other magnetically operated devices.
Switch electrically ahead of a number of individual switches.

master switch

A single electric switch in a wiring system which controls the supply of power to a building, or the action of relays or any other remotely operated devices.
References in periodicals archive ?
This was due to an electrical fault with the master switch for the electric windows.
Turning of the master switch on the dashboard does not turn off the battery power to the equipment in back.
Electrical fires or thermal events can originate in the power window master switch assembly located in the driver door armrest, the NHTSA said.
Adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic master switch and a primary target for those seeking to treat type II diabetes.
SCIENTISTS have found a genetic "master switch" which can turn off the growth of cancerous cells.
"The windows master switch got stuck sometimes and the changing to the new ones is not such a complex process," said Arijit Basu, general manager for sales at Honda Middle East.
Now another book in the same vein, Tim Wu's The Master Switch, presents a historical argument that the information industries are prone to cycles--actually, he calls it the Cycle--in which an initially wide-open industry gives way to a closed empire, until in time, the empire comes under attack, and the Cycle begins again.
--TIM W U, author of The Master Switch: The Rise and Falf of Information Empires (2010), in The New Republic (June 9, 2011)
 They found a link between the KLF14 gene and the expression levels of multiple distant genes found in fat tissue, which means it acts as a master switch to control these genes.
As he sees it, since the Federal Communications Commission permitted the jack's use about four decades ago, "any innovator--any person at all--was suddenly free to invent things [new kinds of phones, fax machines, and so forth] that could usefully be applied to the phone line" That's just one of the tantalizing details in Wu's exuberantly challenging book, The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires.
Wu--the creator of the term "net neutrality"--writes that each major new medium unleashes optimism and innovation, only to consolidate into an empire that seeks to monopolize "the master switch," as Fred Friendly at CBS once called it.