master

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master

1. a great artist, esp an anonymous but influential artist
2. the principal of some colleges
3. a graduate holding a master's degree
4. the chief executive officer aboard a merchant ship
5. Chiefly Brit a male teacher
6. an officer of the Supreme Court of Judicature subordinate to a judge
7. a machine or device that operates to control a similar one
8. the heir apparent of a Scottish viscount or baron

Master

 

(from Latin magister, “head,” “chief,” “teacher”), the name of several offices in ancient Rome, for example, magister equitum, the assistant to the dictator, and magister militum, the commander in chief during the late empire. Later, in Europe, the title of grand master (Grossmeister) was used by the head of a Catholic knightly religious order and by the head of the Masonic Grand Lodge.

master

[′mas·tər]
(engineering)
A device which controls subsidiary devices.
A precise workpiece through which duplicates are made.
(engineering acoustics)
(navigation)

master

master

Primary, controlling. See master-slave communications and master file.
References in periodicals archive ?
It provides inspiration, a renewed spirit that is also closer-think mastery asymptote-to the Spirit of God.
In mastery-based learning, a student and teacher discuss specific next steps to gain better footing on the path to mastery.
Specifically, they found that mastery climates led to decreased anxiety and increased self-esteem, whereas ego climates had the opposite effects.
Rob Bryant - “Our daughters (7 and 9) have attended Personal Mastery Martial Arts for 12 months.
By encouraging Maddie to tie her own shoes, Julie was actually supporting her autonomy -her sense of herself as her own person -while also fostering her sense of mastery.
Individuals with performance-approach dominance scored the highest on all 2x2 achievement goals; they did not differ significantly from the mastery-approach dominance profile in terms of mastery goals.
Elliot and Church (1997) stated that mastery and performance goals are distinctive in terms of approach and avoidance motivation.
According to mastery learning theory (Bloom, 1981; Carroll, 1963), different students require different durations of study to attain the same degree of mastery.
01 Table 3 Study 1: Completely Standardized CFA Model Estimates with Metric and Scalar Invariance Constraints Invoked Factor Loadings Mastery Performance Performance Variables Intercepts Approach Approach Avoidance MAP1 0.
But the correlations of mastery and performance goals with achievement are not as high as many have claimed.
Can the principles of mastery learning be applied to nursing education?
Mastery learning in the science classroom; success for every student.