mastoiditis


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mastoiditis

inflammation of the mastoid process
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Mastoiditis

 

inflammation of the mastoid cells of the temporal bone, affecting the mucous membrane and bony tissue. Most ofter mastoiditis is a complication of a purulent inflammation of the middle ear. Primary mastoiditis arises as a result of trauma to the mastoid process or when infection from sepsis, syphilis, or tuberculosis penetrates by hematogenic means. Symptoms include sharp pain when pressure is applied to the anterosuperior part of the process or to its apex, reddening of the skin, swelling, flabbiness, and protrusion of the auricles forward and downward. In children the temperature rises to 39°-40°C; in adults it often remains normal. Treatment consists of administering antibiotics. If there is prolonged suppuration from the ear (three or four weeks) or at the first signs that infection has spread to the labyrinth and the meninges, treatment is surgical.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

mastoiditis

[‚ma‚stȯi′dīd·əs]
(medicine)
Inflammation of the mastoid cells.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
[8] presented a case in which a 6x2 cm temporal abscess with acute mastoiditis on CT was detected.
Caption: Figure 1: Swelling over the left postauricular region suggestive of acute mastoiditis or mastoid abscess.
Rhodes et al., "Lemierre's syndrome resulting from streptococcal induced otitis media and mastoiditis: a case report," Journal of Medical Case Reports, vol.
(1.) Ransome, J., Acute suppurative otitis media and acute mastoiditis. Scott-Brown's Otolaryngology-Otology, 1987.
Still it is a potentially fatal complication secondary to acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis because of intracranial spread of infections.
SDE can develop after otitis media, sinusitis, mastoiditis, meningitis, trauma, and after craniotomy.
Furthermore, a bilateral mastoiditis and a chronic sinusitis were discovered (Figures 3 and 4).
The husband relayed that the patient had never before in the course of their 35-year marriage behaved in this manner, and he further insisted that the patient was previously generally "happy and smiling." In-house hospital records showed a long history of lupus and psoriasis management as well as a recent admission two weeks prior for mastoiditis; she had received IV clindamycin and ceftriaxone and then been discharged on oral clindamycin.
Doctors diagnosed the young girl with mastoiditis, a serious bacterial infection that affects a bone behind the ear, and kept her in hospital for three days.
Doctors diagnosed her with mastoiditis, a serious bacterial infection that affects a bone behind the ear, and kept her in hospital for three days.
In the etiology, mastoiditis was found in three patients, mastoiditis and meningitis were found in combination in one patient, Behcet's disease was found in three patients and head trauma was found in one patient.
Intracranial complications of acute mastoiditis. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol.