Maté

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Related to mate: soul mate, yerba mate, Mate tea

maté

(mätā`, mătā`),

yerba maté

(yĕr`bä, –bə), or

Paraguay tea,

evergreen tree (Ilex paraguariensis) of the family Aquifoliaceae (hollyholly,
common name for members of the Aquifoliaceae, a family of widely distributed trees and shrubs, most numerous in Central and South America. The evergreen English holly (Ilex aquifolium
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 family). From ancient times Native Americans and now millions of Argentines and others in South America have made a tea (also called maté) from the young leaves and tender shoots of Ilex paraguensis, the source of the best brew, and from closely related species. Mate is the most popular beverage in S South America, and its culture is an important industry in Brazil and Paraguay. The tea is a stimulant and restorative, less astringent than genuine tea, and contains considerable caffeine. The word mate refers also to the cups in which the tea is infused, which are made from curiously shaped gourds or calabashes, with small openings cut in the top and sometimes decorated with silver mountings. The dried leaves are put in a container and covered with boiling water, and the tea is drunk through a bombilla, a tube provided at the lower end with a strainer of fine basketwork, metal, or perforated wood. Mate is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Celastrales.

Maté

 

the dried ground leaves of the evergreen tree Ilex paraguariensis. The tree itself is also called maté. Maté contains up to 1.8 percent caffeine, 0.05 percent theobromine, 9-12 percent tannins, essential oil, vitamins A, B, and C, and citric acid. It is used to prepare a tonic beverage used in South America as tea, which is drunk from a small vessel made from the fruit of a gourd, which is also called maté.


Maté

 

(Ilex paraguariensis), also yerba, a plant of the family Aquifoliaceae. The maté is an evergreen tree measuring 6–16 m tall. The opposite, obovate, and smooth leaves have crenate edges; they are 7–10 cm long and 4–5 cm across. The small, unisexual flowers are usually four-parted and gathered into axillary umbellate inflorescences. The maté most commonly is dioecious, although occasionally monoecious specimens with bisexual flowers are encountered. The fruit is a drupe with four to eight seeds.

The maté grows wild in South America, between 12° and 33° S lat. It is found at elevations of 500 to 900 m above sea level. The plant formerly grew in thickets, most of which have been destroyed. It is cultivated for its leaves and young shoots, which are used to prepare a tonic, also called maté. The plant is cultivated mainly in Brazil and bordering regions of Argentina and Paraguay. Annual production is about 200,000 tons.

REFERENCE

Siniagin, I. I. Tropicheskoe zemledelie. Moscow, 1968.

mate

[māt]
(biology)
To pair for breeding.
To copulate.

mate

1. the sexual partner of an animal
2. Nautical
a. short for first mate
b. any officer below the master on a commercial ship
c. a warrant officer's assistant on a ship
References in classic literature ?
I dared not leave it, so shouted for the mate. After a few seconds, he rushed up on deck in his flannels.
I guv the mate his course, an' the bearun' o' the Askthar Light astern.
You see, that mate, with his black boys, had not been drowned.
The mate ob- served regretfully that he "could not account for that young fellow's whims." What prevented him telling us all about it at once, he wanted to know.
The effect of this was to turn the lidi toward the right, and the longer I watched the procedure the more convinced I became that Raja and his mate were work-ing together with some end in view, for the she-dog merely galloped steadily at the lidi's right about op-posite his rump.
"One man's food another man's poison," the mate remarked.
At the same time I ordered the mate to go into the great cabin, and see what condition the poor passengers were in; and if they were alive, to comfort them, and give them what refreshment was proper: and the surgeon gave him a large pitcher, with some of the prepared broth which he had given the mate that was on board, and which he did not question would restore them gradually.
What could the mate hope to accomplish by taking Jane Clayton from a camp upon a small island from which there was no escape from the vengeance of Tarzan?
Her mate had slowly relaxed from his crouch and was watching her.
I told him I did not know his mate Bill, and this was for a person who stayed in our house whom we called the captain.
"Alas!" he exclaimed, contemplating the melancholy result, "had I but chosen a mate for myself with half the care that I did for my Dog I should now be a proud and happy father."
I met my mates in the morning (I'll never meet them more!); They came and went in legions that darkened all the shore.