maternal deprivation


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maternal deprivation

lack of contact between mother figure and child. The term was coined by BOWLBY (1958) who maintained that maternal deprivation in early life would lead to behavioural problems and delinquency in later childhood and adolescence. This link has subsequently been questioned, particularly by Rutter (Maternal Deprivation Reassessed, 1981), who argued that privation, rather than maternal deprivation, was the more likely cause of the problems shown by the children Bowlby studied.
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Long-term effects of the maternal deprivation on the volume and number of neurons in the rat neocortex and hippocampus.
Effects of Maternal Deprivation on the Expression of NADPH Subunits in the Cortex, Hippocampus, Thalamus, and Caudate Nucleus.
Long-term consequences of early maternal deprivation in serotonergic activity and HPA function in adult rat.
Oitzl, "Ontogeny of the HPA axis of the CD1 mouse following 24 h maternal deprivation at pnd 3," International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience, vol.
Betty painted "thin, nervous old women" who symbolized maternal deprivation (p.
* Extrapolating from research into homeless children, 'maternal deprivation' was held responsible for long-term mental health and behavioural problems in all children (Bowlby, 1951)--causing ordinary mothers to feel self-conscious about work outside the home, and wary of limit-setting.
All parents, as were these parents, are aware of the implications of the term "failure to thrive." Indeed the term "nonorganic failure to thrive" was itself preceded historically by the term "maternal deprivation syndrome." Parents must be acknowledged as the experts regarding their own children, and certainly most parents who have access to appropriate information and resources want only what is best for their children.
By definition, adopted children have lost their biological mother through death, abandonment or separation, thus experiencing maternal deprivation, defined here as resulting from a wide range of possibilities, including maternal privation, being deprived of maternal care from birth or separated from the biological mother after some period of maternal care (Ainsworth, 1962; Gandelman, 1992).
The little boy who grows up with deep maternal deprivation may be forgiven for developing internalised anger against female figures, since mother seems to have resources to meet his needs, but has failed to be present for him emotionally.
We do not have to look far into the past to remember a dark chapter in the history of psychiatry, in which the cause of devastating mental illness (autism, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, for example) was also misattributed to parent behavioral characteristics (maternal deprivation and maternal overcontrol were often cited).
It is now over 30 years since Professor Sir Michael Rutter's "Maternal Deprivation; Reassessed" (1972) study in which he challenged the accepted principle upon which family court proceedings in the UK are based.
Exploring the story of the animals on their dinner plates or the ones that were force fed a new eyeliner or the chimps psychologically destroyed in Harlow's maternal deprivation studies can only contribute to the development of a more fully aware and sensitive professional.

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