math coprocessor


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math coprocessor

[¦math ′kō‚prä‚ses·ər]
(computer science)

math coprocessor

A mathematical circuit that performs high-speed floating point operations. Also called a "floating point unit" (FPU), the math coprocessor may be a stand-alone chip or circuits built into the CPU. Floating point capability is very important to computation-intensive work such as computer-aided design (CAD), and many CAD programs will not operate without it. A spreadsheet may use floating point operations if the circuits are available, but it is not mandatory. See vector processor.
References in periodicals archive ?
* The 486SX and several hybrid 486-386s manufactured by companies other than Intel do not include a math coprocessor.
The 80486DX has a built-in math coprocessor that is ideal for FEA-type analysis and an 8-kilobyte memory cache.
Math coprocessor. A math coprocessor is a special chip that I find indispensable for all the number crunching I do.
MMICAD runs on the IBM PC/XT/AT/286/386/486/PS2 or compatible family of computers with 80 X 87 math coprocessor, hard drives and 640K base memory.
An extension to the highly successful Macintosh II line, the new Apple Macintosh IIx is the first computer in that family to use Motorola's 68030 microprocessor and its 68882 math coprocessor. It is also the first Mac to provide an internal 3.5" floppy disk drive that can read and write to MS-DOS and Apple II formats.
Both versions will calculate more quickly when a math coprocessor is installed in the system.
Hardware: IBM PC/AT and compatibles, math coprocessor.
One good aspect of many laptops is that you can upgrade them as needed, adding more memory, a math coprocessor, additional or larger drives and better display capabilities.
StatView does come in two versions, with the larger version capable of using more memory and a math coprocessor.
The standard configuration of the 80286-based 1000 TL comprises 640K of memory expandable to 768K on the main board, five PC-compatible 10" expansion slots, a real-time clock with battery backup, and support for an optional 80287 math coprocessor.
To speed up operation, try one of these approaches (in order of likely effectiveness): 1) increase your basic computer RAM to 64OK; 2) if the graphics software requires frequent disk access, create a RAM disk using additional memory; 3) add a math coprocessor chip, such as an 80287 (assuming your graphics program will support it); or 4) use a faster microcomputer.