maturity

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maturity

[mə′chu̇r·əd·ē]
(geology)
The second stage of the erosion cycle in the topographic development of a landscape or region characterized by numerous and closely spaced mature streams, reduction of level surfaces to slopes, large well-defined drainage systems, and the absence of swamps or lakes on the uplands. Also known as topographic maturity.
A stage in the development of a shore or coast that begins with the attainment of a profile of equilibrium.
The extent to which the texture and composition of a clastic sediment approach the ultimate end product.
The stage of stream development at which maximum vigor and efficiency has been reached.

maturity

A measure of the developing of strength in concrete; combines the effects of curing temperature and time of hydration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following recent debt buybacks, maturities in 2019 and 2018 dropped below e1/41.4bn for each year, from a cumulative e1/44.5bn two years ago, the PDMO said.
Concurrent with the lengthening of maturities on the asset side of the balance sheet at small banks there has been a shortening on the liabilities side (figure 5).
Bonds with 3, 5, 7 and 10 year maturities sold a total of EGP 6bn, EGP 5.5bn, EGP 4bn, and EGP 1.25bn, respectively.
Now let us assume that there is a world of matched maturities. (8) Lenders reduce consumption for a certain period of time, granting loans to investors who invest in projects expected to have the same duration to completion.
The asymmetric information theory suggests that both high- and low-rated issues should have shorter maturities than intermediate rated issues.
Second, firms can match the maturities of their assets and liabilities to attenuate underinvestment problems, which suggests a negative relationship between asset maturity and short-term debt.
Flannery (1986), Diamond (1991), and others provide intuitive models that rely on the volition of low-risk and high-risk firms with long-term projects choosing different maturities to reduce their financing costs or liquidity risks.
In 1997, GFOA promulgated a recommended practice entitled "Maturities of Investments in a Portfolio." Recognizing the inherent price volatility of longer maturities and the liquidity needs that all governments face in their day-to-day operations, GFOA recommended an overall investment strategy for state and local governments that matches investment maturities with anticipated cash flow requirements.
Some advisers say it's best to spread risk over a series of different maturities while maintaining an average maturity of the client's liking in the portfolio.
The facts that seemed central to the Tax Court's conclusion were that loan maturities were repeatedly extended, there were no repayments of principal and, by pre-arrangement, interest payments were in almost every case immediately relent by the Dutch company to the U.S.