matzo

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Related to matzah: matzah meal

matzo

, matzoh, matza, matzah
a brittle very thin biscuit of unleavened bread, traditionally eaten during Passover

Matzo

 

(Unleavened Bread) thin wafer of unleavened dough; Jews eat matzos during Passover instead of leavened bread, which is prohibited at that time.

References in periodicals archive ?
A second change in the Mishnah's seder is that the hors d'oeuvres have disappeared and the symbolic foods, matzah, lettuce, and haroset, have taken their place.
baking powder and -1/4 cup matzah meal, or substitute -1/4 cup of pancake mix
For example, the words of Dayenu appear in the shape of round matzah in the State of Israel's colors of blue and white.
The brittle sheets of matzah are baked from flour and water in a process that must take no more than 18 minutes from start to finish, to guarantee that the dough does not ferment and begin to rise.
Since Tuesday, Levine has given the Model Matzah Bakery workshops three times a day.
Lifshitz put out the word for people traveling to Nepal to bring matzah and other goods for the holiday.
A federal court ruled that an inmate at Rikers Island does not have the right to be served matzah and grape juice, daily, while imprisoned for first-degree sodomy.
The drivers fondly called the operation "The Matzah Ball Express.
My traditions on my moms side is eating matzah and my traditions on my dad side is painting eggs.
In addition to the previously mentioned custom of Maimonides to recite a blessing both before re'haz and the eating of matzah, other customs are mentioned.
He brought Kosher Matzah packages from Israel, Kosher for Passover wine, Passover Haggadahs (traditional book used on Passover that explains the order of the Seder), which were prepared especially in Hebrew and Chinese, Kosher for Passover cakes, traditional red horseradish, and traditional Charoset (a sweet, dark-colored paste made of fruits and nuts eaten at the Passover Seder).
And it turns out that the sandwichdefined, if you like, as the method of preparation by which the substance is placed between two slices of starchwas not invented by its namesake, John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich, but rather (and really, we should have known this) by Rabbi Hillel, the eating of whose eponymous sandwich, in which bitter herbs (usually horseradish) are placed between two pieces of matzah, is a requisite part of the Passover Seder.