maxillary artery


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Related to maxillary artery: mandibular nerve

maxillary artery

[′mak·sə‚ler·ē ′ärd·ə·rē]
(anatomy)
A branch of the external carotid artery which supplies the deep structures of the face (internal maxillary) and the side of the face and nose (external maxillary).
References in periodicals archive ?
Yorgancilar, "Sudden rupture of the internal maxillary artery causing pseudoaneurysm (mandibular part) secondary to subcondylar mandible fracture," Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, vol.
Angiography demonstrated 6 (26%) tumours being supplied by ipsilateral internal maxillary artery; 7 (30%) tumours were supplied by both internal maxillary arteries; 5 (22%) tumours, apart from receiving blood supply from the external carotid system, also received blood supply from the internal carotid artery, 3 (13%) were supplied bilaterally; and 2 (9%) unilaterally.
The purpose of this study is to report an unusual origin of inferior alveolar nerve and inferior alveolar artery associated with variation in relation to the maxillary artery.
In this study we observed that the maxillary artery groove has a variable location in the superior and lateral edge of the maxillary tuberosity, with an average distance from sphenoidal tubercle of 10.18 mm, with a maximum value of 14.34 mm and a minimum value of 3.6 mm.
We achieved overall success rate of 87.5%, comparable to the international literature, which ranges from 71 to 100%.8 This is also comparable with the average success rate of trans-antral ligation of internal maxillary artery (IMA), which is 87%.9 Reembolization was done in 2 cases.
Accessory meningeal artery arises either from the first part of maxillary artery or the middle meningeal artery.
The various steps include anterior and posterior nasal packing, direct cauterization, external carotid artery ligation, selective maxillary artery embolization, transantral maxillary artery ligation, anterior ethmoid artery ligation, and septoplasty.
The availability of endoscopic technology means that this approach is seldom indicated for the routine management of chronic inflammatory disease, but the procedure is occasionally required for the resection of neoplasms, for the ligation of the internal maxillary artery, and during repair of the orbital floor.
According to different studies, this artery represents an intraosseous anastomosis between the superior posterior alveolar artery, a branch of the maxillary artery, and the infraorbital artery, level with the anterolateral wall of the maxillary sinus (Rahpeyma & Khajehahmadi; Maridati et al, 2014).
Selective entholization of the feeding vessels (i.e., the internal maxillary artery, the transverse facial artery, and the lingual and facial arteries) via a femoral approach was performed with particles of different sizes.
In camels (Camelus dromedarius), the encephalic arteries were described by Kanan (1970) and RERM receives the blood flow from the proximal part of a major internal carotid artery, multiple branches of the maxillary artery and the external ophthalmic artery (Zguigal & Ghoshal, 1991a; Ocal et al, 1998, 1999).
Embolization of the internal maxillary artery was successful in reducing blood flow to the lesion (figure 2, B).