maxillary nerve


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to maxillary nerve: maxillary sinus, mandibular nerve

maxillary nerve

[′mak·sə‚ler·ē ′nərv]
(neuroscience)
A somatic sensory branch of the trigeminal nerve; innervates the meninges, the skin of the upper portion of the face, upper teeth, and mucosa of the nose, palate, and cheeks.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Scores from each veterinarian according to the extension of maxillary nerve staining are summarized in table 2.
When no staining of the maxillary nerve was observed after performing the IO approach, deposition of methylene blue dye was reported on infraorbitary fat, on the infraorbitary nerve or adjacent structures.
Overall, the SBZ approach was associated with higher scores of maxillary nerve staining than the IO approach.
Considering this variants and the surgical relevance due to its neurovascular relations, our objective is to determine morphological and morphometric characteristics of sphenoidal tubercle and also stablish the relationship with bone parameters associated to maxillary nerve and maxillary artery pathways.
On the other hand, the maxillary nerve groove is located in the superior and medial edge of maxillary tuberosity at the inferior margin of the inferior orbital fissure with an average distance from sphenoidal tubercle of 7.6 mm, with a maximum value of 11.51 mm and a minimum value of 4.0 mm.
It has an average distance of 10.18 mm and 7.6 mm to the maxillary artery groove and maxillary nerve groove respectively, so it's an anatomical structure that should be considered as a parameter for the surgical approach of the infratemporal fossa and the neurovascular elements contained in it.
The anaesthetic technique as used in the maxillary nerve via the greater palatine canal is widely accepted in odontostomatology (Seltsam; Slavkin et al.; Moiseiwitsch & Irvine; Methathrathip et al., 2005; Apinhasmit et al.; Douglas & Wormald).
The aim of the technique is to gain entry from the oral cavity and deposit the contents of two tubes of anaesthesia in the PPF, with the purpose of reversing the blockageof the maxillary nerve while passing through this region, thereby allowing a wide area of anaesthesia in the middle third of the face.
On the basis of these observations, we suggest that clinical studies be conducted to determine the minimum amount of anaesthesia to be deposited in the PPF to achieve maxillary nerve block, thereby minimizing the risks of affecting orbital contents and important neurovascular elements in the interior of this anatomical cavity.
None of the sinuses showed any bulge or dehiscence related to maxillary nerve.
Maxillary nerve is related to the inferior part of the lateral wall of the sinus.
In cases of extensive pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus, the maxillary nerve may bulge into the lateral wall of the sinus or may be entirely surrounded by pneumatization and, thus, liable to iatrogenic injury.