mean water level


Also found in: Acronyms.

mean water level

[′mēn ′wȯd·ər ‚lev·əl]
(oceanography)
The average surface level of a body of water.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, for the Bay of Fundy, on charts showing a number of tidal stations, the difference between Chart Datum and Mean Water Level in one section of the charted area may be quite different than it is in other sections.
The distance that the tide moves up or down from the Mean Water Level is called the amplitude of the tide, and the total vertical distance between High Water and Low Water is the tidal range.
The rise in feet of the Higher High Water above Mean Water Level during large and mean tides, and the fall of the Lower Low Waters below that datum, are shown on the chart beside the inserts which indicate the tidal characteristics near the principal tidal stations in the region.
HC] measured in metres from Mean Water Level at Herring Cove.
5 feet is the height of local mean water level above chart datum at Saint John.
The levels are measured from the Mean Water Level (MWL) that the water surface would assume if no tide-producing gravitational influences of Moon and Sun were present.
They also use the term Mean Water Level (MWL), which is the sea level resulting in the absence of tidal influences.
Thus, in tide tables, the term Mean Water Level is used.
Formula for water ingestion exposures of contaminated water is EDI = (C x IR x EF)/BW, where C = concentration of contaminant in water (mg/L, ppm; based on mean water levels between 1953-2000); IR = ingestion rate (L/day; we used the conservative assumption that a diver ingests 24 hr of diving); EF = how often an individual was exposed over a lifetime (we used 1.