understanding

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understanding

Philosophy archaic the mind, esp the faculty of reason

understanding

see MEANINGFUL UNDERSTANDING AND EXPLANATION, VERSTEHEN.
References in periodicals archive ?
I discuss how the framework of remixing (Gainer & Lapp, 2010; Knobel & Lankshear, 2008) and of literacy as a form of meaning-making (Harste, 2003) allowed for an arts-based (Chilton, 2013; Leavy, 2015) exploration of each student's cultural, literacy, and teacher Self.
As more and more librarians across the nation integrate videogames into their youth programs (or contemplate doing so), it is important to examine how youth negotiate their meaning-making within these spaces.
Developing expertise in uses of cultural meaning-making resources is based on socialization processes of learning the cultural and social norms of a discourse community (Kress, 2003).
The result allows space for Indigenous scholars and our allies to create kinshipped meaning-making systems based in stories of place/land addressing the "Rhetoric of Disappearance," wherein it is assumed Indigenous peoples of the south are "more 'vanished' than anywhere else" (Hobson 7), thereby blending multi-discipline narratives weaving choruses of Indigenous presence/persistence onto practices of erasure.
Meaning-making refers to the active process through which individuals reappraise an event or a series of events.
Linguistic and gestural meaning-making through critical framing
As "parables," they compel the audience to realize the importance of contemplating the difficult and dark sides of life because, despite all confusions, contradictions, sham and drudgery, life in this world is still worth living and meaning-making exercises remain inevitable.
The first part of the article briefly describes postmodern approaches to early childhood from the perspective of the 'discourse of meaning-making'.
My research, which involved extensive collaboration with the EAP instructor, explores how specific classroom practices and discourses are enacted and mediated through dialogic intertextualities, material objects, and social actions that frame representations about language, literacy, and what Lefebvre (1988) called "le quotidien" -- the everyday, and how these affect the students' meaning-making potential in specific ways.
Because the acquisition of formal operational thought permits, if not compels, adolescents to ponder complex existential questions, we anticipated that explicit assistance in the meaning-making process through sermons, teachings, and participation in formal rituals would also predict higher rates of youth religiosity.
In this process, a series of meaning-making stages develop that frame the way the person views the self and encounters the world.
Nonetheless, meaning is our common ground, and through relaying something of our meaning-making experiences, we take up meaning making as the object and means of our argument.