understanding

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understanding

Philosophy archaic the mind, esp the faculty of reason

understanding

see MEANINGFUL UNDERSTANDING AND EXPLANATION, VERSTEHEN.
References in periodicals archive ?
The result allows space for Indigenous scholars and our allies to create kinshipped meaning-making systems based in stories of place/land addressing the "Rhetoric of Disappearance," wherein it is assumed Indigenous peoples of the south are "more 'vanished' than anywhere else" (Hobson 7), thereby blending multi-discipline narratives weaving choruses of Indigenous presence/persistence onto practices of erasure.
Meaning-making refers to the active process through which individuals reappraise an event or a series of events.
Linguistic and gestural meaning-making through critical framing
The discourse of meaning-making acknowledges the different ways of seeing and being in the world and early childhood education institutions.
Meaning-making assesses the process of constructing meaning without necessarily deferring to God as an authority figure (sample item: "The worship service helps me make sense of something in my life").
They argued that in less complex meaning-making stages, such as the Interpersonal Balance stage, an individual can be embedded in his or her career performance and may be defined by the career role.
Nonetheless, meaning is our common ground, and through relaying something of our meaning-making experiences, we take up meaning making as the object and means of our argument.
If we view spirituality in large part as a meaning-making activity (see below for further clarification), there is a palpable relationship between spirituality and counseling.
As study investigated the meaning-making processes of college freshmen as they interpreted and discussed poetry.
Similarly, Melissa's meaning-making attempts during phonics literacy events became increasingly more complex.
The growth of the ordinary into something else, the appropriation of style and form to fit a need to express, the meaning-making that resonates with others continues in dance, but never for long without strong roots.
A Black woman rhetorical critic locates self and violates the space of otherness through an African-American women's rhetorical tradition that endorses an ethic of care, dialogue for a meaning-making partnership, and a vision of unity in humanity.