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mean,

in statistics, a type of averageaverage,
number used to represent or characterize a group of numbers. The most common type of average is the arithmetic mean. See median; mode.
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. The arithmetic mean of a group of numbers is found by dividing their sum by the number of members in the group; e.g., the sum of the seven numbers 4, 5, 6, 9, 13, 14, and 19 is 70 so their mean is 70 divided by 7, or 10. Less often used is the geometric mean (for two quantities, the square root of their product; for n quantities, the nth root of their product).

mean

see MEASURES OF CENTRAL TENDENCY.

mean

[mēn]
(mathematics)
A single number that typifies a set of numbers, such as the arithmetic mean, the geometric mean, or the expected value. Also known as mean value.

mean

Maths
a. the second and third terms of a proportion, as b and c in a/b = c/d
b. another name for average See also geometric mean

MEAN

(MongoDB, Express, AngularJS, Node.js) A set of system software used for developing JavaScript-based Web applications. Node.js is server-side JavaScript, while Express provides an abbreviated framework for it. AngularJS is used for client-side JavaScript, and MongoDB is a highly scalable database that supports full clustering and automatic sharding. See MongoDB, Node.js, LAMP and database partitioning.
References in classic literature ?
Thus there is more logical affinity between a word and what it means in the case of words of our present sort than in any other case.
It is not necessary, in order that a man should "understand" a word, that he should "know what it means," in the sense of being able to say "this word means so-and-so." Understanding words does not consist in knowing their dictionary definitions, or in being able to specify the objects to which they are appropriate.
'MUST a name mean something?' Alice asked doubtfully.
'I mean,' she said, 'that one can't help growing older.'
Or like shoemaking for the acquisition of shoes,--that is what you mean?
You mean when money is not wanted, but allowed to lie?
Of course, in the beginning, this cannot be effected except by means of despotic inroads on the rights of property, and on the conditions of bourgeois production; by means of measures, therefore,which appear economically insufficient and untenable, but which, in the course of the movement, outstrip themselves, necessitate further inroads upon the old social order, and are unavoidable as a means of entirely revolutionising the mode of production.
Strictly speaking, ZUG means Pull, Tug, Draught, Procession, March, Progress, Flight, Direction, Expedition, Train, Caravan, Passage, Stroke, Touch, Line, Flourish, Trait of Character, Feature, Lineament, Chess-move, Organ-stop, Team, Whiff, Bias, Drawer, Propensity, Inhalation, Disposition: but that thing which it does NOT mean--when all its legitimate pennants have been hung on, has not been discovered yet.
"It is correct," said the King, "so far as the numbers and sexes are concerned, though I know not what you mean by 'right' and 'left'.
Upon this, Wilkins was immediately summoned; who having confirmed what the captain had said, was by Mr Allworthy, by and with the captain's advice, dispatched to Little Baddington, to inform herself of the truth of the fact: for the captain exprest great dislike at all hasty proceedings in criminal matters, and said he would by no means have Mr Allworthy take any resolution either to the prejudice of the child or its father, before he was satisfied that the latter was guilty; for though he had privately satisfied himself of this from one of Partridge's neighbours, yet he was too generous to give any such evidence to Mr Allworthy.
What do I mean? If my taking so much trouble to recover her does not mean that I care for her, what does it mean?
"Bill Starkey," continued John, "did not mean to frighten his brother into fits when he dressed up like a ghost and ran after him in the moonlight; but he did; and that bright, handsome little fellow, that might have been the pride of any mother's heart is just no better than an idiot, and never will be, if he lives to be eighty years old.