measured spectrum

measured spectrum

[′mezh·ərd ′spek·trəm]
(spectroscopy)
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Subtracting it from the measured spectrum yields the pure vibronic component (Fig.
This is because we did not compare to an actual measured spectrum but are interested only in the relative peak intensities.
4) implies that the measured spectrum must also be reduced by the factor [(R/r).
Also, in the case of water, the width of the measured spectrum is wider than in the case of IPA, which can be logically explained by the fact that CMUT structure is more damped by the water than IPA due the higher specific mass.
Application of anti-coincidence techniques using double-layer detection offers the possibility to reject detected events with uncertain initial energy and so significantly improve the overall measured spectrum.
The galaxy is the most distant with a measured spectrum, joining the ranks of five others spectroscopically confirmed to exist in the universe's first 760 million years, or what astronomers call a redshift of 7.
In the second, analyte adsorbed to a 'surface plasmon stack' changes the final measured spectrum.
Therefore the artifacts exposed by the splicing method have to be considered as part of the overall budget associated with the uncertainties of the measured spectrum using a CCD array spectrometer.
Because the measured spectrum has an unknown line shape, accurate comparison is not possible, so high spectral accuracy cannot be achieved, and only rough mass locations can be considered.
Figure 2 also compares the relative difference (in percent) between the measured spectrum, used here as the reference, and the predictions of each model (SMARTS, SPCTRAL2, and SUNSPEC) after proper smoothing to match the instrument's bandwidth (5 nm).
In fact, the measured spectrum of sunlight that makes it to our eyes after scattering off nitrogen and oxygen molecules remains roughly as intense at violet wavelengths as it does at blue ones, he notes.
Contrast in the resulting chemical images arises from the varying amounts of absorption, emission, or scatter that occur in the measured spectrum at each image pixel.