measuring day

measuring day

[′mezh·ə·riŋ ‚dā]
(mining engineering)
The day when work is measured and recorded for assessing the wages.
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References in periodicals archive ?
1] and the water level H on the measuring day, and [DELTA]H/[DELTA]t is the rate of change over the previous i days.
Could we have a yearlong contest to see who can grow the longest beard in a calendar year, with photos before and after and a measuring day during the celebration?
2]/s at the lower (from ground to the top: the 1st to 7th branches), middle (8th to 14th branches) and top (above 15th to top branches) layers of a 4 year old well grown plant's canopy from 9:00 am to 11:00 am of each measuring day (28th January, 5th March, 7th April, 12th May, 20th July, 11th October).
The row culminates in an official measuring day, when town residents, such as the snobbish Pratt sisters, who run a fashion boutique, hope to prove Lark Rise is beyond the eight-mile limit.
The children will look after and monitor their sunflowers until September when there will be a Grand Measuring Day.
Stop measuring days by degree of productivity and start experiencing them by degree of presence.
Such practices underwent dramatic changes beginning in the 19th century as industrializing nations such as Great Britain began measuring days by "manufacturers' time," aided by the development of better timekeeping devices.
A whole new set of metrics is needed, measuring days of disability and absence, return-to-work program success, drivers of absence, direct product impacts, and indirect costs.
Jews were not the first to be concerned with time nor to devise ways of measuring days, weeks, months, and years.