mechanical erosion

mechanical erosion

[mi′kan·ə·kəl i′rō·zhən]
(geology)
References in periodicals archive ?
Most karst landforms are interpreted to have developed as a result of simultaneous limestone dissolution and mechanical erosion - this single stage process of landform development can be referred to as karstification by total removal (Quinif, 2010).
The structural integrity of the residual alterite is indicated by the fact that the thermodynamic regime has not imparted enough energy to cause its mechanical erosion - the cavity itself has formed as a result of fossil hunting excavations.
Due to the melting of ground and rim material, and through mechanical erosion, the mass of lava carved an ever-deeper and broader bed to form canyons.
This reduction in the density of the coral skeletons makes them more vulnerable to mechanical erosion during storms and to organisms that bore into corals, such as worms, or that feed on them, such as parrotfish.
This drives ice erosion, which can be classified into three categories: (i) thermal erosion, (ii) thermo-mechanical erosion and (iii) mechanical erosion.
Mechanical erosion is the most important ice erosion process in the Baltic Sea.
Mechanical erosion is due to each bullet wiping away a slight amount of steel, or breaking off tiny pieces of an eroded bore.
Green described the most common failure modes in coreless refractory linings: hot-face erosion, mechanical erosion, buildup, bridging, finning, spalling and saturation.
Mechanical erosion is the result of the mechanical abuse.

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