mechanical translation

mechanical translation

[mi′kan·ə·kəl tranz′lā·shən]
(computer science)
Automatic translation of one language into another by means of a computer or other machine that contains a dictionary look-up in its memory, along with the programs needed to make logical choices from synonyms, supply missing words, and rearrange word order as required for the new language. Also known as machine translation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Firstly, participant A pointed out that he would avoid a mechanical translation process and repetitions.
To amateur translators, or people new to the field, Translation Cloud intends to serve as a sort of mechanical translation tutor, tracking the accuracy of their proofreading skills.
(1) 'Although the first ideas for mechanical translation were made in the seventeenth century, it was not until this century that means became available for realization with the appearance of the electronic computer in the mid 1940s' (Hutchins, 1997, pi).
He felt that the innovative service offered definite advantages and could lead to another marvel: simultaneous and mechanical translation," which was being used to great effect at the United Nations and had been a huge success when tested the previous year in Ottawa at the North Atlantic Alliance conference.
Much of the confidence in the scope of mechanical translation, which marked the 1950s and early sixties, has ebbed.
A framework of a mechanical translation between Japanese and English by analogy.
By using rolling drums, belts, wheels, perforated tape and typewriter-like output methods, were the first truly mechanical translation devices (Freigang 2001).
First, one sees the typical mechanical translation of rnam pa (akara, "form, shape, figure, aspect, appearance, expression, sign, identity") (2) as "aspect." Even more troubling, however, is the translation of mkhyen pa as "exalted knowledge." One assumes that, in "exalting" this "knowledge," Powers has sought to render the impact of the honorific language (zhe sa) in which the Tibetan translators have couched the Sanskrit term (i.e., mkhyen pa, rather than shes pa).
A motion control or positioning device is comprised of four elements: a motor or actuator, a mechanical translation mechanism (stage), a motion sensor, and control electronics that maintain the desired position.
Attempting to avoid the mechanical translation of critical truisms into Bakhtinian terminology, Roberts reminds us that dialogism includes genre as well as voice, and that it is through their interaction that social forces and ideologies are represented.
In addition, using a rotating galvanometer mirror (two-dimensional scanner), the optical system can scan a large surface much faster than the mechanical translation of a conventional detector.