mechanize

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mechanize

[′mek·ə‚nīz]
(mechanical engineering)
To substitute machinery for human or animal labor.
To produce or reproduce by machine.
(ordnance)
To equip a military force with armed and armored vehicles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Farsi presented a report on the status of agricultural mechanization in Hamedan province and in addition to present the relevant data, the effect of mechanization on the production processes of crops such as: corn, wheat, sugar beets, alfalfa, sunflower, potato evaluated them positive and introduces it as increase reason for the area under different products cultivation [6].
Asserting that Agriculture Ministry is already promoting farm mechanization through various schemes and programmes, Pawar further said: "In order to lay special emphasis on farm mechanization and to bring more inclusiveness, we have proposed a dedicated Sub-Mission on Agricultural Mechanization for the XIIth Plan.
Looking ahead, if no new mechanization and automation solutions are developed in the next five to ten years, the specialty crop industry could suffer greatly.
The following technologies were adopted by the farmers in the study area: Rehabilitation techniques, mechanization, improved seedlings, fertilizer, improved spacing, herbicides, insecticides and fungicides.
The final social organizational property is technology, deriving its importance from the fact that mechanization is the root of industrialization.
Mechanization is leading to a decline in forestry-related jobs, which has been compounded by the softwood lumber dispute with the U.
Local vineyard experts Justin Morris and Tommy Oldridge are seeing their latest mechanization invention being tested with two California companies.
In essence," they write, "technology is promoting competition by enabling conversion of what once was perhaps unnecessarily embodied in human intermediaries into explicit rules that lend themselves to mechanization.
Over the past half-century, American agriculture has become enormously more productive, thanks to the massive use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, sophisticated new means of breeding crops and livestock, and innovations in mechanization.
And both sides understand there is a lot at stake, with each acknowledging that the upcoming contract is likely to be one of a historic nature, maybe even as important as the original Modernization & Mechanization agreement of 1960, which protected union longshore jobs in the face of the containerization revolution.
His magnum opus on Prtouve reflects both his need to understand the mechanization of architecture and his social concern, for both are combined in his hero.

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